Biology

BIO 100 Concepts of Biology 4 SH
This is an introductory course for the non-science major. Basic concepts from cell structure and function to evolution and ecology are studied and related to current human concerns. Laboratory activities, which range from microscope investigation to field study, complement the lecture. Each semester. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory) General Education: Lab Science.

BIO 103 General Biology I 4 hrs Each Sem.
This is one half of a two-semester introductory course in which the major principles of biology are studied. Topics investigated are the chemical and physical foundations of life, cell structure and function, metabolism, development and genetics. (Meets general education requirements only if BIO 104 is also successfully completed.) Fall semester-Day, Spring semester-Evening. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory) General Education: Lab Science.

BIO 104 General Biology II 4 hrs Each Sem.
This is one-half of a two-semester introductory course in which the major principles of biology are studied. Topics investigated include evolution, ecology, animal behavior and the characteristics of the five kingdoms of life. (Meets general education requirements only if BIO 103 is also successfully completed.) Fall semester-Evening. Spring semester-Day. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory) General Education: Lab Science.

BIO 105 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 SH
This course is the first half of a two-semester course providing an introduction to the structure and function of the human organism. Topics covered include an introduction to anatomical terminology, biological chemistry, cells, tissues and the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous. Laboratory exercises complement the lecture material. Fall semester. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO 106 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 SH
This course is the second half of a two-semester course providing an introduction to the structure and function of the human organism. Topics covered include the circulatory, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Laboratory exercises complement the lecture material. Prerequisite: BIO 105. Spring semester. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO 108 The Microbial World 4 SH
This is an introductory biology course for non-majors, addressing fundamental biological principles using microorganisms as a focus for thought and discussion. In the laboratory, students will carry out inquiry-based investigations that require group cooperation and discussion. Topics include the role of microbes in maintaining the biosphere, microbes and human health, and microorganisms in research and applied technologies. Offered every other spring in odd-numbered years. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory) General Education: Lab Science.

BIO 110 The Animal World 4 SH
The characteristics of representative vertebrate and invertebrate animals are studied. The course is oriented to a phylogenetic approach, progressing from simple to complex forms. Consideration is given to functional anatomy, behavior and the role of the animal in its ecosystem. Animal dissection is a requirement in the laboratory portion of this course. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs lab.) General Education: Lab Science.

BIO 111 General Botany 4 SH
In this course the structure, reproduction, physiology and ecology of the major plant groups (algae, fungi, mosses and vascular plants) are considered. Environmental, economical and practical aspects of plants are studied. Laboratories complement the lectures. A field trip to the New York Botanical Gardens is included. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs. laboratory) General Education: Lab Science.

BIO 115 Plants and Society 4 SH
This course will consider the importance of domesticated plants in human societies. The plants that stand between humans and starvation will be considered in context with how plant domestication occurs. The home vegetable garden will be used as the venue for understanding domestication and the relationships between domesticated plants and their wild relatives. Other topics include the importance of wild populations in crop improvement and plants as sources of beverages, drugs, fibers and dyes. Labs will consist of bench work and field trips; the local supermarket will serve as a surrogate lab for part of the course. General Education: Lab Science.

BIO 123 Local Flora 2 SH
This is an introductory field course on the identification of local native plants. Experience in collecting, pressing, mounting and identifying plants. A collection of identified pressed plants is a requirement for the course. No prior experience in plant identification is required. Eight weeks. (5 hrs: lecture, laboratory experiences by demonstration, discussion and field work) General Education: Lab Science.

BIO 125 Food and Human Nutrition 2 SH
This course is an introduction to human nutrition. Topics covered include food nutrients, their utilization by the body and their role in health. Food fads, food additives and food choices will be examined from a broad perspective. Eight weeks. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory and field work) General Education: Lab Science.

BIO/ENV 126 Animals and Their Environment 2 SH
In this course the activities of selected animals and their role in the environment are studied. Field trips are required (some may be on Saturdays). Eight weeks. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory) General Education: Lab Science.

BIO/ENV 129 Horticulture 2 SH
This course is an introduction to plants useful to people. It will examine the basic structure and function of plants and their culture requirements. Emphasis will be placed on methods for growing vegetables, herbs, fruits and flowers which can be used in the New England home environment. Eight weeks. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory and field work) General Education: Lab Science.

BIO 130 Human Life Before Birth 2 SH
This course provides the non-science major with an insight into the origin of the individual human organism and the environment in which this development occurs. Eight weeks. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory) General Education: Lab Science.

BIO 132 Human Biology 4 SH
This course is intended for students not majoring in biology and will fulfill the general education lab science requirement. Human biology introduces students to the scientific method, the structure and function of the human body, diseases, the evolution of humans, and ecology. Laboratory exercises complement lecture material. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory) General Education: Lab Science.

BIO 133 Human Development Before Birth 4 SH
This course is intended for students not majoring in biology and will fulfill the general education lab science requirement. The material also provides the non-science major with insight into the biological origin and prenatal development of the individual human organism and the environment in which this development occurs. Laboratory exercises complement lecture material. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory) General Education: Lab Science.

BIO/ENV 156 Biology of the Environment 4 SH
An ecosystem approach to the study of the environment which looks at biological components and their interactions, including human impacts on the environment. Natural resources and conservation management of such resources are examined. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory and field trips) General Education: Lab Science.

BIO 200 Ecology 4 SH
This course reviews the basic mechanisms regulating the interaction of living organisms with their environment. Topics include energy flow, community structure, ecological succession, population ecology and biomes. Field trips are required. Prerequisite: BIO 103 and 104. Fall semester. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO 203 Invertebrate Zoology 4 SH
This course consists of a study of the morphology and anatomy of representative invertebrate animals from a phylogenetic approach. The increasing complexity of each of the representative types is discussed. Prerequisite: BIO 104 or 110. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO 204 Vertebrate Zoology 4 SH
A comparative study is made of the vertebrate classes. The anatomy, physiology, evolution and behavior of the vertebrate classes will be surveyed, with an emphasis on the phylogenetic continuity of structures and functions. The laboratory will stress anatomy while lectures will stress physiology and evolution. Prerequisite: BIO 103 and 104. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO 205 Animal Physiology 4 SH
This course is an introduction to the physiology of animals. Although mammals will be emphasized, invertebrates and other vertebrates will also be covered. Anatomy pertinent to physiology will be discussed. Laboratory experiments complement lecture material and introduce students to various laboratory techniques. Prerequisite: BIO 104 or 110. Spring semester. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO 206 Plant Morphology 4 SH
This course will survey the major groups of plants, including fungi, algae, mosses, ferns and seed plants. General aspects of the structure, function, reproduction, adaptation, ecology and evolution will be considered. The regional flora will be used to illustrate the major plant groups. Prerequisite: BIO 103, 104, or 111. Fall semester. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO 207 Plant Physiology 4 SH
This course includes the growth and development of the plant and its parts, the relation of plants to water and minerals, and the effects of environmental factors on plant morphology, photosynthesis, and respiration. Prerequisite: BIO 104 or 111. Spring semester. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO 208 Animal Behavior 4 SH
The biological basis of natural animal behavior will be studied with a stress on ecological and evolutionary considerations. Mechanisms of social behavior will be examined, as will specific examples of social systems. Prerequisite: BIO 104. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO 209 Plant Systematics 4 SH
This course will consider the principles of biology that apply to discovering, describing and understanding the diversity of plants. Lecture will concentrate on principles of classification, understanding relationships between plant groups, and the diversity of flowering plants. Laboratory will focus on identification of plants in our region. Field trips required. Prerequisite: BIO 104 or 111. (2 hrs lecture - 4 hrs laboratory)

BIO 212 Plant Diversity and Evolution 4 SH
This course will consider the diversity of land plants in evolutionary and ecological contexts. A phylogenetic framework will be used to explore relationships between plant form and function. The regional flora will be emphasized to illustrate major plant groups. One full-day Saturday field trip is required. Prerequisite: BIO 103 and 104 (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO 215 Microbiology 4 SH
This course is intended for non-biology majors. In the course we will survey important microorganisms found in our environment, with special attention given to those that parasitize humans and animals. Lectures include structure, metabolic activities, control and host response to infection. Laboratory provides supporting study of all groups, with emphasis on the culture, identification and metabolic activities of bacteria. Prerequisite: CHE 121 and BIO 106 or permission of instructor. Fall semester. (2 hrs lecture - two 2-hr laboratories)

BIO 216 General Microbiology 4SH
This course is intended for biology and medical technology majors. In this introductory course students will study the fundamental structural and metabolic characteristics of microorganisms (mainly prokaryotes) and will learn basic techniques for enrichment, selection, isolation, enumeration and identification. In the course we will address not only the ability of microorganisms to cause disease, but also their role in research, their importance in functional ecosystems and their economic significance. Prerequisite: BIO 104 and CHE 111, or permission of instructor. Not open to students who have passed BIO 215. Offered every other spring (in even numbered years. (2 hrs lecture - two 2-hr laboratories)

BIO 225 Cancer Biology 3 SH
Cancer biology will introduce the student to cancer in the context of abnormal cell division and specialization. A study of the history, current status and likely future aspects of our understanding of this disease will be undertaken. Prerequisite: One 4-credit biology course. (3 hrs lecture)

BIO 297 Biology Cooperative Education/Option II

BIO 298 Faculty Developed Study 1-6 SH

BIO 299 Student Developed Study 1-6 SH

BIO 300 Cell Biology 4 SH
This course is a study of the activities of cells, including evolutionary and molecular perspectives. The laboratory work will include an examination of different types of cells, the cellular environment, cell culture, cellular bioenergetics and cell work, as well as an introduction to the instrumentation used to study cellular activities. Prerequisite: junior standing in biology or medical technology; one semester of organic chemistry. Spring semester. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO 310 Vertebrate Embryology 4 SH
This course is a study of the development of selected vertebrates, providing a foundation for understanding the embryological development of the human body. Prerequisite: BIO 104 or 110. (2 hrs lecture - two 2-hour laboratories)

BIO 311 Developmental Biology 4 SH
A study of the concepts of plant and animal development provides a basis for the organization of much interdisciplinary information. A consideration of the historical development and current status of these concepts make up the subject matter of the course. Prerequisite: BIO 104 or 110 and 111 and junior standing in biology. Fall semester. (2 hrs lecture - 4 hrs laboratory)

BIO 312 Genetics 4 SH
This course will cover the basic principles of genetics, including classical genetics, molecular genetics, gene expression, quantitative genetics, cytogenetics, population genetics and evolutionary genetics. Prerequisite: BIO 103 and 104 and junior standing. Fall semester. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO 320 Conservation Ecology 4 SH
This course will explore the rapidly expanding field of conservation ecology and management of the detrimental impact humans have on their biological environment. Basic ecological issues will be considered in context of principles of ecology, population biology and wildlife management--from global, regional, and local perspectives. Laboratory consists of field trips and guest lectures. Prerequisite: BIO 200.

BIO 321 Immunology 4 SH
This course is an introduction to the mammalian immune system. Lectures include discussion of antibody formation and function, cellular immune responses, allergies, tissue transplantation, cancer and disorders of the immune system. Laboratory experiments complement lecture material while introducing the student to immunological research techniques. Prerequisite: BIO 103 and BIO 104, a year of college chemistry and junior standing in biology, or permission of instructor. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO 325 Evolutionary Biology 3 SH
This course emphasizes evolution as the unifying theme of biology. Topics covered will include evidence for evolution, historical evolution of life, mechanisms of evolutionary change and the molecular basis of evolution. Current ideas and controversies in evolutionary biology will be discussed. Prerequisite: BIO 312 or permission of instructor. Alternate spring semesters. (3 hrs lecture)

BIO 330 Systematic Biology 3 SH
This course will cover the science behind our understanding of the tree-of-life. A focus will be he taxonomic revolution that is sweeping biology and its relationship to conceptual advances in data analysis and advances in DNA technologies. Topics covered will include the nature of species, how relationships between species are estimated based on both morphological and molecular data, what these data reveal about evolutionary relationship, and how the resulting classifications are used as a tools in the present biodiversity crisis. Examples will be taken from all kingdoms of life to illustrate the principles discussed. Prerequisite: BIO 103, 104 and 200 (3 hours lecture)

BIO 360 Scientific Communication 2 SH
This course is designed to familiarize students with the art of scientific communication. Techniques of literature search, scientific writing, and seminar presentations of scientific research are included. Appropriate student assignments are made for each phase of the discussion and include writing a grant proposal for a research project. Prerequisite: junior standing in biology. Every semester. (2 hrs lecture)

BIO 400 Environmental Microbiology 4 SH
This is an advanced microbiology course for students who have already been introduced to basic microbiological concepts and techniques. This course covers the study of microorganisms in natural environments, including specialized techniques for sampling, culture, isolation and identification. We will learn about the ecology and diversity of microbial communities in soil, water, and air as well as in unusual environments such as deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Topics include wastewater treatment, bioremediation, biofilm engineering, and other applications related to public health, agriculture, food science, and industry. Students will read primary literature and are expected to participate in at least one field trip. Prerequisite: Bio 215 or BIO 216 or BIO 312 or permission of instructor. (3 hours lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO 410 Topics in Molecular Genetics 4 SH
This course will cover selected topics in molecular genetics, with emphasis on current developments in gene structure and expression and on applications to biotechnology. Laboratory exercises will consist of an integrated set of experiments culminating in cloning of a prokaryotic gene. Emphasis will be on experimental design and analysis. Prerequisite: BIO 312 or CHE 421 or equivalent. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO/CHE 440 Molecular Biology 3 SH
A consideration of the molecular bases of biological phenomena. Prerequisite: junior standing in the major or permission of the instructor. (3 hrs lecture)

BIO 450 Population Ecology 3 SH
This course will consider the theoretical, experimental, and empirical foundations of population ecology. Topics covered will include density-independent and density-dependent mechanisms of population regulation, life history evolution, competition, predator-prey relationships, metapopulations, island biogeography, and applications to conservation biology. Prerequisite: BIO 200 or equivalent; MAT 101 recommended. (3 hrs lecture)

BIO 460 Ecosystem Ecology 3 SH
This course will cover the flows of energy, carbon, and nutrients that make ecosystems function. The following central themes will be developed: the linkage between populations and processes, interactions between plants and soils, and the effects of environmental change on ecosystem processes. Prerequisite: BIO 104 and 200 or equivalent.

BIO 470 Entomology 4 SH
This course provides a broad examination of insect structure, physiology, ecology, and classification. The ecological role of insects in ecosystem processes will be emphasized. The laboratory will provide experience in field and lab techniques used in the study of insects. Prerequisite: BIO 104 and 200 or equivalent. (3 hrs lecture - 3 hrs laboratory)

BIO 490 Senior Research 3 SH
Individual laboratory or field research projects which may include original research are carried out. The student chooses the project with a faculty member who becomes the project advisor. Students meet regularly with the advisor to give progress reports. A formal paper is submitted and an oral report of the project's findings is given to the department's majors and faculty. Prerequisite: BIO 360 and 2.0 grade point average in major. Every semester.


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