Social Sciences

Chair: Laurie Weinstein
weinsteinl@wcsu.edu
Warner Hall 211, Midtown campus
(203) 837-8453
(203) 837-8905 (fax)

Tina Maripuu, Department Secretary
maripuut@wcsu.edu
Warner Hall 224, Midtown campus
(203) 837-8484
(203) 837-8905 (fax)

Faculty by major program focus:

Anthropology & Sociology

C. Bandhauer S. Ward L. Weinstein, Chair
R. Whittemore    

Economics

S. SKinner, Eco. Coord. O. Owoye Z. Pan

Geography

Alex Standish

Political Science

T. Godward C. Kukk R. Manes

Adjunct Faculty

A. Araza S. Benjamin I. Best
A. Bibeau W. Devlin T. Flynn
P. Ho-Southard J. Hatcherson J. Jowdy
R. Kopfstein B. Morrison S. Rolnick
J. Sikora M. Speraza J. Wharton

Overview

Convinced that it has a special responsibility to prepare students for the ever-changing demands of contemporary society, the department provides disciplinary and methodological instruction and practice in the social sciences. To this end, courses are offered in anthropology, economics, geography, political science, sociology and social sciences research methodology. The department awards the B.A. degree in four programs: anthropology and sociology; economics; political science; and interdisciplinary social sciences.

The department offers the B.S. degree in anthropology/sociology, political science and interdisciplinary social sciences, as an academic major for students seeking an elementary education teaching certificate. The B.S. degree in interdisciplinary social sciences also meets all state requirements for an academic major for students seeking the secondary education teaching certificate entitled “History and Social Studies.” The B.S. degree programs require additional courses in professional education and formal admission by the education department.

This curricular effort is supported by department computer and archaeology laboratories and a map room. The department’s role in the university-affiliated Jane Goodall Institute generates opportunities for students to become academically involved in the institute’s mission of environmental, conservation and primate studies. Additionally, the department has cooperative departmental cross-listing of some courses and exchange of faculty instruction with several university departments such as communication, theatre arts, education, environmental sciences, finance, history and non-western cultures, justice and law administration, management (public administration) and social work.

The department sponsors a campus chapter of an international honor society in the social sciences, Pi Gamma Mu. Membership gives recognition to scholastic achievement, thereby enhancing employer and graduate admissions consideration. The campus chapter also provides the opportunity for members to contribute their talent for the benefit of the university and general community. Obtain details from the department office. 

The department also sponsors and publishes annually the Social Sciences Journal of original research written by students. Students are invited to contribute their essays or research papers for review.  The two student and one faculty editor then choose the best examples of student work for publication.

Mission

The four social science programs at WestConn provide students with a holistic understanding and critical appreciation of the cultural, political, social and economic behavior of society. The department curriculum presents a broad-based foundation in the social sciences while offering a rich and diverse range of degree programs and options.

B.A./BS: ANTHROPOLOGY/SOCIOLOGY

The allied fields of anthropology and sociology offer ways of understanding the world that are fundamental to many courses of study. Anthropology and sociology look at everyday life in the context of groups, societies and cultures to which humankind contribute. The program is designed to provide background for varied business, government and social service careers as well as for advanced graduate studies in a wide area of disciplines. There is an anthropology/sociology and elementary education option for students desiring to become elementary school teachers.

B.A.: ECONOMICS

The economics program provides students with an understanding and appreciation of the economic behavior of individuals, business and society. The focus is on social outcomes of economic transactions and events, as well as on economic performance. Economics is taught as part of a liberal arts education at WestConn, not as preparation for any particular vocation. Nonetheless, economics provides an especially relevant background for careers in business or government, as well as for graduate study in economics, law or business.

BA/BS: POLITICAL SCIENCE

Students of political science are given an opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the political aspects of society. They are provided with a practical background for a variety of legal, government, public and social service careers, and a preparation for graduate studies in political science, as well as in related fields, such as pre-law. There is a political science and elementary education option for students desiring to become elementary school teachers.

B.A./B.S.: SOCIAL SCIENCES

This interdisciplinary major provides students with both a broad-based foundation in the social sciences and with a variety of course choices, allowing a student to focus on a specific topic or theme, such as global studies, family studies, or multi-cultural studies. This program is considered particularly relevant for teachers. There are two options for joining the major in social sciences with the majors in elementary education or secondary education.

Objectives

  • Emphasizes social research methodology and analytical skills.
  • Provides a personalized learning environment for students through faculty mentored undergraduate research opportunities and cooperative education research.
  • Prepares students for graduate education in the social sciences and allied fields.
  • Assists students in discerning appropriate careers through advising.
  • Fosters the growth and development of faculty through research, attendance at professional meetings, developing and directing public forums and discipline-related training workshops, and publication and presentation of scholarly work.
  • Expresses its strong commitment to public service by collaborating with agencies and organizations, such as Jane Goodall Institute, Housatonic Valley Association, Connecticut State Archaeology Office and Institute for American Indian Studies, and with regional elementary, junior and senior high school educators to promote social sciences education.

Degree Programs in Social Sciences

Degree and minor programs require a minimum GPA of 2.0 (There are additional requirements for education students majoring in social sciences). All department majors are required to earn at least a “C” (2.0) minimum grade in any foundation course (100 level) specified within the student’s major program and in the two required methods courses: SS 201 and SS 400. Students should contact the department chair in order to sign up for their required research seminar, SS 400, one semester prior to registration. Details of the below listed programs are presented on the next several pages.

Bachelor of Arts

Anthropology/Sociology (*)
Option:
Applied Studies

Economics
Option:
Applied Studies

Political Science (*)

Social Sciences (**)
Option:
Anthropology/Sociology Studies
Family Studies
Global Studies
Multi-cultural Studies

(*) Meets state requirements as academic major for students seeking elementary teaching certificate. B.S. degree awarded to education students.
(**) Meets state requirements as academic major for students seeking elementary or secondary teaching certificates. B.S. degree awarded to education students. Program guide sheets may be obtained from the department secretary, Warner Hall 224.

Minor Programs in Social Sciences

Anthropology
Conflict Resolution
Cultural Resource Management
Economics
Multi-cultural Studies
(with elective African-American focus)

International Studies
Museology
Political Science
Sociology
Urban Studies
Women’s Studies

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science in Anthropology/Sociology (B.A./B.S.)

Advisers assigned by department chair:

The anthropology/sociology program is an interdisciplinary effort towards understanding the social and cultural aspects of human behavior. The program is designed to provide background for varied business, government and social service careers as well as for advanced graduate studies in a wide area of disciplines.

The anthropology/sociology program requires twenty-four (24) semester hours in the courses specified below and fifteen (15) semester hours of anthropology and sociology electives. The B.A. requirements consist of a minimum total of 122 semester hours, including the courses of the major, the required general education courses, free electives, physical education and foreign language. Students should complete their general education requirements in English and mathematics/computer science by their sophomore year.

The B.S. degree in anthropology/sociology is offered as a state-approved academic major for students seeking an elementary education teaching certificate. Students must also meet the course requirements of and be formally accepted into the education department.

Majors are required to earn at least a “C” (2.0) minimum grade in foundation courses (100 level) and in the two required methods courses: SS 201 and SS 400.

Students should contact the department chair one semester prior to registering for their required research seminar, SS 400.

Specified courses for the B.A./B.S. in Anthropology/Sociology

MAT 120 Elementary Statistics
ANT 100 Introduction to Anthropology
ANT 110 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology
SOC 101 Social Problems
ANT/SOC 330 Social and Cultural Theory
ANT/SOC 350 Modern and Postmodern Societies
SS 201 Researching Social Issues
SS 400 Research Seminar
Fifteen (15) semester hours (200 level or above) in anthropology and sociology. (One NWC course or geography course is allowable as elective in major. Students seeking the elementary education teaching certificate must complete a course in geography).

 

Suggested four-year course sequence for B.A. in Anthropology/Sociology

First Year

Fall Semester
Spring Semester
ENG-as per English placement test (at least one WI course required) SOC 101 Social Problem * (offered fall or spring)
MAT-as per mathematics placement test (major requires MAT 120) Any 3 general education courses
ANT 100 Intro to Cultural Anthropology*(offered fall or spring)  
SOC 100 Intro to Sociology* (offered fall or spring)  
Any general education course  

 

Sophomore Year

ANT 110 Intro to Physical Anthro* (offered fall only) Any two 200 or 300 level Anthro/Soc courses
SS 201 Research Social Issues* (offered fall or spring) Any three general education courses
Any 200 level Anthro/Soc course  
Any two general education courses  

 

Junior Year

Any two 200-400 level Anthro/Soc courses ANT/SOC 350 Modern & Postmodern Societies (offered spring only)
Any three courses from free elective section, which may include add'l Anthro/Soc courses, or courses for a second major or for a minor Any three courses as free electives, or as additional Anthro/Soc courses or as courses for a second major or for a minor

Senior Year

ANT/SOC 330 Social Cultural Theory (offered fall only) SS 400 Research Seminar* (offered either fall or spring)
Any four courses as free electives or as add'l Anthro/Soc courses, or as courses for a second major or for a minor Any four courses as free electives or as add'l Anthro/Soc courses, or as courses for a second major or for a minor
   
   
   

*minimum grade of "C" required

Anthropology/Sociology: Applied Studies Option

Fifteen (15) semester hours of electives in the major may be used to form the option of applied studies, if selected from the following courses:

ANT 206 Culture and Law
ANT/CTA 208 Intercultural Communication
ANT 229 Archaeology Field Methods
ANT/SOC 305 Contemporary Family Problems
ANT/SOC 340 Culture Change and Planning
SOC 201 Criminology
SOC 205 Juvenile Delinquency
SOC 210 Urban Sociology
SOC 230 Sociology of the Community
SOC/SW 260 Aging: Impact, Needs and Services
Any appropriate course with prior Department approval.

Minor in Anthropology

Eighteen (18) semester hours, to include:

ANT 100 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ANT 110 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
Four anthropology electives (200 level or above)

Minor in Cultural Resource Management (CRM)

Cultural resource management has become an increasingly significant subfield of archaeology as a result of federal and state legislation. Examples of such legislation are the Archaeological Resources Protection Act (1979) and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (1990). The minor in CRM presents students with theoretical, methodological and practical experience, which will help them obtain professional employment in archaeology.

Minimum Eighteen (18) semester hours to include:

ANT 225 Introduction to Archaeology: Rocks, Stones and Bones
or
ANT 226 New England Archaeology
ANT 229 Archaeological Field Methods
ANT 297 Coop Education Internships
ANT 341 Cultural Resource Management
HIS 294 Introduction to Historical Research
ANT 213 North Amer. Indian

Minor in Sociology

Eighteen (18) semester hours, to include:

SOC 100 Intro. to Sociology
SOC 101 Social Problems
Four sociology electives (200 level or above)

Bachelor of Arts in Economics (B.A.)

Program Director: S. Skinner

Requirements:

The economics program seeks to foster an understanding and appreciation of the economic behavior of society. The focus is on the social outcomes of economic transactions and events rather than on individual economic performance per se. Thus economics is regarded and taught as part of a liberal education at WestConn, not as preparation for any particular vocation. Nonetheless, economics provides an especially relevant background for employment in business or government, as well as for graduate study in economics, law or business.

The B.A. in Economics is awarded upon completion of all general education requirements, the courses listed below, and free electives to total a minimum of 122 semester hours, including physical education and a foreign language. Majors are required to earn at least a “C” (2.0) minimum grade in foundation courses (100 level) and in the two required methods courses: SS 201 and SS 400 or ECO 350. Students should contact the department chair one semester prior to registering for their required research seminar, ECO 350 or SS 400.

Specified courses for B.A. in Economics:

ECO 100 Principles of Macroeconomics*
ECO 101 Principles of Microeconomics*
ECO 205 Intermediate Microeconomics
ECO 206 Intermediate Macroeconomics
SS 201 Researching Social Issues
ECO 350 Seminar in Economic Research
or
SS 400 Social Sciences Research Seminar
MAT 181 Calculus I
or
MAT 118 Elementary Applied Mathematics
or
MAT 135 Concepts of Calculus
FIN 230 Business Statistics
Six economics courses (200 level or above; PS/ECO 110 allowed)

*Note for ECO 100 and ECO 101: It is recommended that students have either completed MAT 098 or have achieved scores on the appropriate mathematics test equivalent to MAT 098 or a higher level of mathematics course. Students should complete their general education requirements in English and mathematics/computer science by their sophomore year.

Suggested four-year course sequence for B.A. in Economics

First Year

Fall Semester
Spring Semester
ENG-as per English placement test ECO 101 Prin. of Microeconomics*
MAT-as per mathematics placement test (MAT 101 or MAT 118 or MAT 135 is required) Any four general education courses (incl. lab sci)
ECO 100, Principles of Macroeconomics* (Math level of at least MAT 098 highly recommended)  
Any two general education courses  

 

Sophomore Year

ECO 205 Intermediate Micro Eco ECO 206 Intermediate Macro Eco
Any economics course Any economics course
Any two general education courses Any two general education courses
FIN 220 Business Statistics I FIN 221 Business Statistics II

 

Junior Year

SS 201 Research Social Issues * SS 400 Research Seminar *
Any two economics courses Any four courses as free electives, or as add'l courses in economics, or as courses for a second major or for a minor
Any two courses as free electives, or as add'l courses in economics, or as courses for a second major or for a minor  

 

Senior Year

Any five courses as free electives, or as add'l courses in economics, or as courses for a second major or for a minor Any five courses as free electives, or as add'l courses in economics, or as courses for a second major or for a minor

*A minimum of a "C" grade is required.

Economics: Applied Studies Option

Fifteen (15) semester hours of electives in the major may be selected as specified below to develop an option of applied studies:

ECO 302 Applied Econometrics
ECO 303 Applied Quantitative Methods for Economics
ECO 300 Theory of International Economics
or
ECO 204 Economic Development & Growth
ECO 304 Structure of American Industry
or
ECO 202 Labor Economics
ECO/FIN 360 Money Banking and Capital Markets
or
ECO 200 Money and Banking

Minor in Economics

Eighteen (18) semester hours, to include:

ECO 100 Principles of Macroeconomics
ECO 101 Principles of Microeconomics
Four economic electives (200 level or above)

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science in Political Science (B.A./B.S.)

Program Advisers: C. Kukk, T. Godward and R. Manes

Requirements

The department’s program in political science is designed to provide a foundation for public service careers as well as graduate studies in political science or related fields in the social sciences. The B.S. degree in political science is offered as a state approved academic major for students seeking an elementary education teaching certificate. (For the certificate, students must also be formally accepted into the education program of the education department.)

The B.A. requires completion of the courses listed below, all general education requirements and additional free electives to a minimum of 122 semester hours, including physical education and foreign language. Students should complete their general education requirements in English, MAT 120 and mathematics/computer science by their sophomore year. Majors are required to earn at least a “C” (2.0) minimum grade in foundation courses (100 level) and in the two required methods courses: SS 201 and SS 400. Students should contact the department chair one semester prior to registering for their required research seminar, SS 400.

Specified courses for B.A./B.S. in Political Science:

PS 100 Introduction to Political Science
PS 102 American Government
PS 104 World Governments, Economies and Cultures, or PS/ECO 110 Political Economy
SS 201 Researching Social Issues
SS 400 Research Seminar
Five approved courses in political science (200 - 400 level)
Two approved courses from the following areas: anthropology, economics, geography, history, sociology. Students seeking the elementary education teaching certificate must choose courses in geography and sociology.
MAT 120 Elementary Statistics

 

Suggested four-year course sequence for B.A. in Political Science

First Year

Fall Semester
Spring Semester
ENG-as per English placement test PS 102 American Gov't*
MAT 120 PS 104 World Gov'ts, Cultrs, Politics*
PS 100 Intro to Political Science* Any three general education courses
Any two general education courses  

 

Sophomore Year

Any two political science courses Any two political science courses (300/400 level recommended)
General Ed laboratory science Any three general education courses (incl. psychology and NWC courses)
Two courses* from ANT, ECO, HIS, or SOC  

Junior Year

SS 201 Research Social Issues* SS 400 Research Seminar*
Any political science course Any four courses as free electives, or as add'l political science courses, or as courses for a second major or for a minor
Any three general education courses, and/or any courses as free electives, or as add'l political science courses, or as courses for a second major or for a minor Any four courses as free electives, or as add'l political science courses, or as courses for a second major or for a minor

 

Senior Year

Any five courses as free electives, or as add'l political science courses, or as courses for a second major or for a minor Any five courses as free electives, or as add'l political science courses, or as courses for a second major or for a minor

*A minimum of a "C" grade is required.

Minor in Political Science

Eighteen (18) semester hours, to include:

PS 100 Introduction to Political Science
PS 102 American Government
Four political science electives (200 level or above)

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science in Social Sciences (B.A./B.S.)

(Also available evenings)

Advisers assigned by department chair:

The interdisciplinary major in social sciences is designed to provide a broad foundation in the social sciences and to allow a variety of course choices through which one of several topics or themes may be emphasized.

The B.S. degree program in the social sciences meets all state requirements as an academic major for students seeking either the elementary education teaching certificate or the secondary education teaching certificate entitled “History and Social Studies.” (For the certificate, students must also be formally accepted into the education program of the education department.)

The B.A. requires completion of the courses listed below, as well as elective and specified general education requirements and additional free electives to a minimum of 122 semester hours, including physical education and foreign language. Majors are required to earn at least a “C” (2.0) minimum grade in foundation courses (100 level) and in the two required methods courses: SS 201 and SS 400. Students should complete their general education requirements in English and mathematics/computer science by their sophomore year. Students should contact department chair one semester prior to registering for their required research seminar, SS 400.

Specified courses for B.A./B.S. Social Sciences

Select any three (3) of the five courses listed:

(1) ANT 100 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
(2) ECO 100 Principles of Macroeconomics
(3) GEO 100 Principles of World Geography*
(4) PS 100 Introduction to Political Science
or PS 102 American Government
(5) SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology*
Required Courses:
SS 201 Researching Social Issues
SS 400 Research Seminar in Social Sciences
Fifteen (15) semester credits of electives in the social sciences (200-400 level; may include one 100 level course): ANT, ECO, GEO, PS, SS, or SOC

Note: students seeking the secondary education credential must have at least one course in each of these four areas of discipline labels: (1) ANT or SOC; (2) ECO; (3) GEO; and (4) PS.
HIS 186 Europe: Pagan and Medieval (also fulfills general education requirement)
HIS 187 Modern Europe (also fulfills general education requirement)
HIS 248 American History: To 1877
HIS 249 American History: Since 1877
Any two (2) Non-Western Cultures courses (3 S.H. of which also fulfills general education requirement)
MAT 120 Elementary Statistics, or both MAT 105 and 106, Foundations of Mathematics I & II* (also fulfills general education requirement)
PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology (also fulfills general education requirement)
Forty-four (44) semester credits of free electives
*Elementary education students must take SOC 100; GEO 100; MAT 105 and 106. Elementary education students are exempted from the foreign language requirement.

Suggested four-year course sequence for B.A. Social Sciences

First Year

Fall Semester
Spring Semester
ENG-as per English placement test Select one* from ANT 100, ECO 100, GEO 100, PS 100 or PS 102, SOC 100
MAT-as per mathematics placement (major recommends MAT 120; MAT 105 and 106 together also meets requirement) HIS 187 Modern Europe
Select two* from ANT 100, ECO 100, GEO 100, PS 100 or PS 102, SOC 100 Any three general education courses (incl. psychology, CTA, or lab sci)
HIS 186 Europe: Pagan & Medieval  

 

Sophmore Year

HIS 248 Amer Hist to 1877* HIS 249 Amer HIst since 1877*
Any NWC course* Any NWC course*
Any two 200 level or above courses with these labels: ANT, ECO, GEO, PS, SOC, or SS Any two 200 or higher level courses with these labels:  ANT, ECO, GEO, PS, SOC, or SS
Any general education course Any general education course

Junior Year

SS 201 Research Social Issues* SS 400 Research Seminar*
Any 300/400 level courses with one of these labels:  ANT, ECO, GEO, PS, SOC or SS Any four courses as free electives, or add'l courses in ANT, ECO, GEO, PS, SOC or SS (recommend 300/400 level), or courses for a second major or for a minor
Any three general education courses and/or free electives  

 

Senior Year

Any five courses as free electives, or as add'l courses in ANT, ECO, GEO, PS, SOC or SS (recommend 300/400 level) courses for a second major or as courses for a second major or for a minor Any five courses as free electives, or as add'l courses in ANT, ECO, GEO, PS, SOC or SS (recommend 300/400), or as courses for a second major or for a minor

*A minimum of a "C" grade is required.  NOTE:  secondary teacher candidates must complete the social sciences major requirements by the end of their junior year.  The B.S. degree in Social Sciences is nearly the same as given above, but there are some important differences.  Consult with your major advisor and use the Social Sciences/Secondary Education major program sheet available at Warner Hall 224.

Options in the Social Sciences

The fifteen (15) semester hours forming each option may be selected in place of the 15 hours of electives within the social sciences major. The options suggest themes for study and give transcript recognition for such study.

Anthropology/Sociology Studies Option in Social Sciences

Fifteen (15) semester hours of any ANT or SOC 200-400 level courses (ANT 110 Introduction to Physical Anthropology is allowable).

Family Studies Option in Social Sciences

Fifteen (15) semester hours as specified:
ANT/SOC 221 Human Family Systems
ANT/SOC 305 Contemporary Family Problems
Choose three (3) of the following:
ANT/SOC 204 Culture and Personality
SS 301 Guided Readings in Family Studies
SW/SOC 260 Aging: Impact, Needs & Services
SOC 205 Juvenile Delinquency
Any appropriate course with prior department approval

Global Studies Option in Social Sciences

Fifteen (15) semester hours as specified: Select at least one course from each of the following three groupings and select an additional two courses from those listed in the groupings or from social science (or history) courses approved in advance by the department chairperson.

(1) ANT 222 Peasant Societies, or ANT/SOC 350 Modern & Postmodern Societies, or SS 101 Intro. to Third World Development
(2) ECO 201 Comparative Economic Systems, or ECO 204 Economic Development & Growth, or ECO 208 Contemporary International Economic Issues
(3) PS 200 International Relations, or PS 305 Comparative Government & Politics, or PS 306 Comparative Communist and Post-Communist Systems Additional two courses from above selections or by department approval

Multi-cultural Studies Option in Social Sciences

Fifteen (15) semester hours as specified:

(1) SOC 200 Concepts of Race & Ethnic Relations
(2) ANT/CTA 208 Intercultural Communication, or
ANT/SOC 322 Comparative Minority Relations, or
ANT/SOC 340 Culture Change & Planning
(3) ANT/SOC 350 Modern & Postmodern Societies, or
PS/SOC 310 Political Sociology, or
SOC 202 Class, Status & Power
(4) ANT/SOC 221 Human Family Systems, or
SW 220 Cultural Diversity*
(5) Any AAS (200 level) course or ethnography as
AAS/ANT 212 Africa, ANT 213 N. American Indians,
ANT 214 Pacific, ANT 298 Readings/Ethnography
* SW 220 does not meet social sciences requirements for teaching certificate in history & social studies.

Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Minor Programs

Minor in Conflict Resolution

Faculty Advisor: R. Averell Manes

Eighteen (18) semester hours are required.

To successfully negotiate today’s stressful and competitive environment, people require highly refined communication and conflict resolution skills. This minor program in conflict resolution allows students to learn about, practice and further develop some key fundamental behaviors designed to establish powerful rapport with others, and to manage conflict creatively and constructively when it occurs. In addition, the knowledge and insights gained in the basic core courses heighten intellectual pursuits in many other disciplines, such as political science, history, communication, theater arts, criminal justice and law, and management.

To enroll in this minor program, contact the program advisor listed above. In addition to two required foundation courses, SS 401 and SS 402, your advisor will help you select four additional elective courses from the list below. The program advisor may approve other elective courses if content is deemed relevant to the program. No more than six (6) credit hours should be selected from any one discipline or from the student’s major. The conflict resolution minor program sheet/guide is available from the program advisor.

Required Foundation Courses

SS 401 Fundamentals of Conflict Resolution 3SH
(Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the instructor)
SS 402 Mediation: Theory & Practice 3SH
(Prerequisite: SS401 or permission of the instructor)

Electives offered by the Dept. of Social Sciences:
ANT/COM 208 Inter-cultural Communication 3SH
ANT/SOC 322 Comparative Minority Relations 3SH
PS 200 International Relations 3SH
PS 401 Global Conflict Resolution 3SH
PS 402 Violent & Nonviolent Conflict Resolution 3SH
SOC 101 Social Problems 3SH
SOC 200 Concepts of Race & Ethnic Relations 3SH
SOC 202 Class, Status & Power 3SH
SS 299 Student Developed Study/Coop Internship 3SH

Electives offered by other departments:
COM 210 Nonverbal Communication 3SH
COM 212 Effective Listening 3SH
COM 362 Organizational Communication 3SH
COM 368 Strategies of Persuasion 3SH
HIS 256 Background to the Civil War 3SH
HIS 318 Civil War 3SH
JLA 426 Conflict Resolution & Management 3SH
MGT 350 Management Negotiations 3SH
MGT 376 Managing People 3SH
PSY 207 Organizational Psychology 3SH

Minor in Multi-cultural Studies

(with elective African-American Focus)

Faculty Advisor: R. Whittemore

Eighteen (18) semester hours are required.

In addition to the required course, SOC 200 Concepts of Race and Ethnic Relations, a student may petition the faculty advisor for acceptance of any course (100-400 level) from any discipline provided the university catalog course description indicates substantial ethnic, minority and cultural diversity subject coverage.

If at least twelve (12) semester hours are in African-American studies (AAS) courses (100-400 level), the student’s transcript shall read: minor in multi-cultural studies: African-American focus.

Minor in Museology

Faculty Adviser: S. Ward, R. Whittemore and L. Weinstein

(Eighteen semester hours are required.)

This is an interdepartmental minor in museum education. It is designed to prepare a student, along with his or her major in the social sciences, to act as a liaison between museums and the general community, and between museums and teachers and students.
Note: SS/CED 297 refers to a museum internship under the supervision of department faculty.
ART 108 Design I
ART 140 Photography
ART 280 Exhibition Techniques
SS/CED 297 Cooperative Education (Museum Internship) - 6 SH
ENG 245 Technical Writing or ENG 255 Copywriting
Any appropriate substitute course should have prior department approval.

Minor in Urban Studies

Faculty Adviser: S. Skinner and S. Ward

The urban studies minor is an interdisciplinary program focusing on urban issues, concepts, and problems. The minor affords students the opportunity to explore urban concerns through a variety of disciplinary lenses and the chance to examine practical solutions to urban problems. The minor also prepares students for increased employment possibilities at the municiple, state, or federal level, or for graduate work in one of several areas related to urban studies (e.g., urban studies, urban, town, or regional planning, urban geography, demography, etc.)

Students select eighteen semester hours from the courses listed below; no more than nine hours should be from 100 level courses and no more than six hours should be selected from any one discipline or from the student’s major. Students are strongly encouraged to apply 3-6 semester hours earned in an approved cooperative education internship to this program.

ANT 350 Modern & Postmodern Societies 3 SH
ART 101 History and Appreciation of Western Art:
Renaissance to the Present 3 SH
ECO 209 Urban Economics 3 SH
ECO 100 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 SH
or
ECO 207 Contemporary Domestic Economic Issues
GEO/ENV 150 Urban Environment as a Human
Ecological Problem 3 SH
HIS 203 Rise of Industrialism in America 3 SH
HIS 263 The American City 3 SH
HIS 268 New York City: History and Culture 3 SH
PS 103 American State & Local Government 3 SH
HSC 342 National & World Health Problems 3 SH
(permission of instructor required)
SS/CED 298 Coop Internship 3 SH
SOC 210 Urban Sociology 3 SH
SOC 230 Sociology of the Community 3 SH
SOC 101 Social Problems 3 SH
Any appropriate substitute course must have prior department approval.

Minor in Women’s Studies (WS)

Faculty Adviser: L. Weinstein, C. Bandhauer

The women’s studies minor is an interdisciplinary and interdepartmental program that provide the opportunity for students to increase their awareness and knowledge about women’s achievements and contributions to society, and about social concerns and issues that are of particular importance to women and to all minority groups. The eighteen credits in the minor shall consist of electives with a WS label or courses with a discipline label which are identified as relevant by a committee drawn from participating departments. Students should contact their faculty adviser for a list of recommended electives.

WS 200 Introduction to Women’s Studies
WS/ANT 236 Culture, Sex and Gender
WS/ANT 314 Native Peoples of the Southwest: Women, Spirituality and Power
WS/COM 211 Women, Language and Communication
WS/COM 374 Women and the Media in the U.S.
WS/ECO 212 Economics of Gender
WS/ENG 334 Women Writers
WS/ENG 437 Topics in Literature by Women
WS/HIS 320 Women and Leadership
WS/JLA 301 Women and Criminal Justice
WS/NUR 250 Women’s Health Issues
WS/PSY 217 Psychology of Women
Recommended cognate elective courses for Women’s Studies
SOC 221 Human Family System
SOC 305 Contemporary Family Problems
SW 220 Cultural Diversity: An Experiential Approach

Minor In International Studies

Minor in International Studies: Interdisciplinary

The object of the international studies minor is to encourage WestConn students to adopt a more expansive view of the world around them. As a world power the United States continues to be more and more involved in the political, economic and cultural affairs of many countries. Our own security is dependent to an important degree on our relations with other countries, large and small. Many American jobs are dependent on overseas markets. Our well-being, therefore, depends on the understanding of foreign peoples, their histories and cultures. Giving our students some recognition in the form of an international studies minor may very well assist them in their career goals no matter what their major happens to be.
Eighteen (18) semester hours are required.

To fulfill the requirements of the international studies minor the student must:

  1. Satisfactorily complete four 200 level or above 200 level courses, the content of which are substantially international in nature. (The coordinator of the WestConn International Center will have a list of the appropriate courses.) The decision as to which courses fulfill this requirement shall be left to the coordinator of the WestConn International Center who shall advise the student accordingly. These four courses must be selected from at least two of the following six categories:
    1. ANT/SOC/SS
    2. ED/HED
    3. ECO/FIN/MKT
    4. FR/SPA
    5. ENG/COM/PHI
    6. GEO/HIS/PS
  2. Satisfactorily complete two 100 level courses which examine cultures other than European or American (NWC labels).

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