Events and Announcements

2015 Honors Convocation
James Munz Logic Award: Shane O'Keefe
Outstanding Philosophy Minor Award: Caitlin White
Outstanding Philosophy Major Award: Jacob Grossman


PHILOSOPHY COURSES
Fall 2015


ETHICAL ISSUES IN BUSINESS
PHI 110 / Professor Kristin Aronson / Wed 5.25-7.55 PM / Midtown Campus

Explores ethical issues and value conflicts from the standpoint of the organization, the employee, the marketplace and public policy. Case studies of actual situations will be analyzed.

    

ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY
PHI 231 / Professor Richard McKim / Tues/-Thurs 10.50 AM-12.05 PM / Midtown Campus

The philosophers of the ancient world still exert a powerful influence on the modern world, from science and psychology to ethics and religion. We’ll take an in-depth look at the great thinkers of Greece and Rome, from Plato and Aristotle to the dawn of Christianity, and survey their vital role in the making of Western civilization.

   

ETHICS AND THE NONHUMAN
PHI 112 / Professor Kristin Aronson, Tuesday 5.25-7.55 PM, Midtown Campus

Examines issues raised by the animal rights and environmental movements, including a historical overview of our conceptions of the nonhuman; new data from molecular biology; communication with primates; the treatment of animals in biomedical research, product testing and agrobusiness; the moral basis of vegetarianism; issues raised by hunting, trapping, endangered species and zoos.

        

POST-MODERN PHILOSOPHY: EMPIRE AND FRAGMENTATION
PHI 338 / Professor Clayton Bohnet / Mon-Wed 9.25-10.40 PM / Midtown Campus

This course seeks to creatively and critically analyze (a) the issues facing an emergent global community, (b) the tension between capitalism and government, (c) the nature of the self and relationships in the digital age, (d) the obsolescence of traditional narratives, and (e) the new forms of power and resistance manifest in technology, gender and art.

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PHILOSOPHY OF DEATH AND DYING
PHI 245 / Professor Hannes Charen / Mon-Wed 12.15-1.30 PM / Midtown Campus

One thing we can be sure of is that we are going to die. But what are we to make of that fact? What does it mean to die? Should we be allowed to decide to end our lives? Who gets to decide when or whether someone dies? These are some of the questions we will be addressing through topics such as: the death penalty, euthanasia, suicide, mortality and immortality, religious views, aging and hospices, suffering, personal identity, cryonics, and organ donation.

      

OTHER FALL 2015 PHILOSOPHY CLASSES

PHI 100: Introduction to Philosophy (3 sections, Midtown, Westside, and online)
PHI 103: Intro to Critical Reasoning (Professor Stuart Dalton, Tues/Thurs 12.15-1.30 PM, Midtown)
PHI 111: Ethical Issues in Healthcare (2 sections, Tues. or Thurs. 5.25-7.55 PM, Midtown)
PHI 227: Ethics in Computing (Tuesday 10.50 AM-1.30 PM, Westside)
PHI 241: Buddhist Philosophy (Professor Marcello Kilani, Mon/Wed 10.50 AM-12.05 PM, Midtown)
PHI 252: Philosophy in Film (Professor Hannes Charen, Mon/Wed 3.05-4.20 PM, Midtown)
PHI 265: Philosophy of Happiness (Professor Mary O’Neill, Tues/Thurs 1.40-2.55 PM, Midtown)

 


HUMANISTIC STUDIES CLASSES
Fall 2015

SUBVERSION AND TRANSGRESSION
HUM 298-01 / Professor Juniper Alcorn / Tues-Thurs 3.05-4.20 PM / Midtown Campus

To subvert or transgress is to do more than to just break a rule, it is to purposefully reject rules, norms, and authority. Does that mean that the subversive can only ridicule authority? Or that transgression is merely shock art, meant only to disturb and upset? We will explore subversion and transgression as forms of art and activism in counterculture, avant garde, and youth movements in the 19th and 20th centuries.
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INTRODUCTORY INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: UTOPIAS & DYSTOPIAS
HUM 198 / Professor Juniper Alcorn / Tues-Thurs 12.15-1.30 PM / Midtown Campus

Utopias are ideas or images of possible perfect cities that writers use to express hopes for the future and a better way of life. But what if every time we try to imagine a utopia, we are in fact describing a dystopia, a society so controlled by ideas of perfection that individual freedom is sacrificed? This class will explore utopian visions across many disciplines, including literature, philosophy, history, and science.

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SCIENCE AND THE HUMAN QUEST FOR KNOWLEDGE
HUM 298-04 / Professor Richard McKim / Tues-Thurs 1.40-2.55 PM / Midtown Campus

We live in a world dominated by science and technology to an extent unimaginable a few short decades ago. And yet the scientific worldview generates many fascinating philosophical puzzles. From its roots in ancient Greece to the mind-bending mysteries of modern physics, we’ll explore the power and possible limitations of science as well as the influence of technology on our values and our vision of ourselves.

  

MYSTICISM IN RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY
HUM 298-03 / Professor Sharisse Kanet / Tues-Thurs 3.05-4.20 PM, Midtown Campus

Mysticism is the belief that humans can directly connect with the ultimate truth of the universe, whether that be God or a universal energy. Mystical religions and philosophies include Buddhism, Taoism, Kabbalah, and Sufism. We will explore their beliefs, with special attention to similarities between traditions that had little or no historical contact. If the same ideas pop up in different times and places, might the mystic vision be true?

        

ART AND DEATH
HUM 298-02 / Professor Katherine Graham / Mon-Wed 1.40-2.55 PM / Westside Campus

Philosophical questions about the nature of death and dying through the lens of art, including: What is death? What happens when we die? Can I survive my own death? Is suicide ever a moral or rational choice? We will examine how fundamental questions concerning our mortality have found expression throughout the ages in painting, literature, music and drama.

      

OTHER FALL 2015 HUMANISTIC STUDIES CLASSES
HUM 100: Conceptions of Society (Professor Jonathan Pickle, Mon/Wed 3.05-4.20 PM, Midtown)
HUM 102: Art and Experience (Professor Katherine Graham, Mon/Wed 10.50 AM-12.05 PM, Westside)
HUM 110: Moral Issues in Modern Society (Professor Katherine Tullmann, Online)
HUM 113: Comparative Religions (Professor Mark Horton, Monday 5.25-7.55 PM, Westside)
HUM 114: The Greek Experience (Professor Marcello Kilani, Mon/Wed 12.15-1.30 PM Midtown)
HUM 115: Philosophical Issues in Literature (Professor Jonathan Pickle, Mon/Wed 1.40-2.55 PM, Midtown)
HUM 116: The Human Condition (Professor William Spontak, Monday 5.25-7.55 PM, Waterbury Campus)

 

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