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WCSU Racial Justice Coalition

*Fall 2021 Racial Justice Courses

Department / Course #/  Title Course Description Competencies Instructor Format Days/Times
AAS 100 – The Black Experience in America This is an interdisciplinary course that examines major historical and contemporary conditions that have contributed to shaping the experiences of black people in America. The course utilizes a variety of original source material in history, literature, art, music, film, sociology and politics in order to understand the thinking of and reaction to African-Americans over nearly 400 years. Danielle King Campus R 5:30-8:00
AAS 113 – Southern African Cultures Multidisciplinary approach to the study of the Republic of South Africa and its neighbors. Includes ethnography, history, economic development, the growth of Apartheid, the spreading of the South African problem to its contiguous countries and current political and foreign policy implications. Fall semester.  Rob Whittemore Campus TF 12:30-1:45
ANT 222 – Global Rural Cultures: Resistance and Change Between two-thirds and three-quarters of the world’s people may be classified as peasants and out of this, the third world, comes today’s principal revolutionary potential. Spring semester of even-numbered years. IC Rob Whittemore Campus MR 12:30-1:45
ANT 398 – There’s No Place Like Home There’s No Place Like Home will investigate home as a space of kin relations and primary attachments and an affective space of memory and emotion, and students will look at home from a cross-cultural perspective and consider the experience of home through the lens of race. Among other topics, we will read about displacement due to Hurricane Katrina and the fragmentation of Black communities, Apache ‘placemaking’ practices and how they shape identity and community, female seclusion in West African architecture, the politics of Black feminist ‘homemaking,’ White social aspiration and home aesthetics in Sweden, and how eviction disproportionately affects Black families. We will also engage in autoethnography and art-making practices that ask student to reflect on their own (inevitably racialized) experience in the world. Christine
Hegel-Cantarella      and Sabrina Marques
Campus W 5:00
ANT 400 – Africa in Cinema It is impossible to fully grasp the rich texture and challenges of contemporary Sub-Saharan African life without engaging with its cinema. Films by African directors demand that we move beyond the typical touristic representations: grass-roofed homes, exoticized ritual performances, rural imaginaries of uninterrupted subsistence livelihoods.  It is also irresponsible to attempt to ignore the historical-cultural origins of African sensibilities now recognized in this various and inspired cinematic tradition.  A few selected reading accounts will supplement the viewing of at least one feature length film each week over the course of the term. Rob Whittemore Campus TF 9:30-10:45
ECO 240 – Environmental Economics Environmental economics focuses on the economic perspectives on environmental and natural resources issues. The course uses cost-benefit analysis, combined with the supply and demand model, as a tool to examine the value of environmental goods and services to the economy; how climate change has reinforced and worsened economic inequalities; and the larger costs of global warming to global society, especially the racial inequities of the judicial and health care systems. Rotua Lumbantobing Campus MW 11:00-12:15
ED 314 – Multicultural Education This course will examine cultural diversity in American society and schools. Participants will expand their knowledge of cultural, social, economic and other essential issues related to our complex, pluralistic society in relation to our educational system. Content will include lessons that promote tolerance, respect, and understanding of cultural groups through technology, research, problem solving and collaboration. Development of analytical and evaluative strategies that foster an inclusive classroom will also be explored. IC Marsha Daria Hybrid ASYNCH M 8:00-9:15
HIS 115 – Latin American & Caribbean Civilization This course examines the development of Latin America and the Caribbean as overlapping, though distinct regions, from before the Spanish Conquest of America to the present day. Many of the units consider a specific historical episode or era, while also posing a broader question concerning how these regions are understood in the United States. Major themes include the Conquest, Afro-Brazilian culture, popular politics in the 20th century, revolutions and revolutionary iconography, art and literature. Classroom discussion centers on the political, social and cultural elements that characterize Latin America and the Caribbean. IC Joshua Rosenthal ASYNCH
HIS 251 – Revolution & Resistance in Latin America–1812 to Present This class explores the history of Latin America since Independence emphasizing the changes of those two centuries. Major themes include Independence, state formation, nationalism, urbanization, rebellion, economic development and economic nationalism, and national identity. Events receiving special attention include, the Mexican Revolution, Cold War politics, the Cuban Revolution, and contemporary politics. IC Joshua Rosenthal Campus MR 12:30-1:45
HON 398 – Flash of the Spirit In this course, we will pursue two goals: studying and familiarizing five different African cultures and understanding the introduction of as well as the transitions and reinventions of these cultures in the New World. The course is divided into 5 parts: Yoruba (Nigeria); Kongo (Northern Angola, Western Congo); the Rara of the Universe (Benin); Round Houses and Rhythmized Textiles (Mali); and, the Emblems of Prowess (Cross River: Calibar region). Throughout the course, students must keep in mind some of the central components of these cultures and how they’ve evolved or were assimilated on their journey to and within the New World. Modes of Inquiry: Textual Analysis, Historical and Socio-Cultural Analysis, Artistic Creation and Analysis. Dirck Westervelt Campus W 3:30-6:00
HON 398 – Latinas/os/x in United States A comparative look at Latinos/as/x in the United States, the course uses a socio-historical lens to examine political, economic and cultural links between Latin America, including the Caribbean, and the US, and then explores the growth and developments among and between the broad array of Latinos/as/x within the U.S. social structure, including family, education, health, employment and identity are explored.  Racism, and the sense of belonging and acceptance/non-acceptance, as well as empowerment and resistance movements are closely examined.  The course engages rich discussions over recognition, racial and ethnic identities, language, gendered identities, Latinos/as/x as a voting block, struggles among youth, and struggles over immigration and the border. IC CT Carina Bandhauer Online Synch R 5:30-8:00
HPX 247 Indigenous Spirituality & Environmental Activism (see course description below for HUM 247) This course looks at indigenous cultures of the Americas, Central Asia, Africa and Australia. With a focus on their vital and spiritual relationship to their distinctive environments, it examines the challenges they face from the forces of colonization and globalization, their environment actions, and the views and actions opposing them. 

 

Suzanne Potter Ironbiter Hybrid ASYNCH T 2:00-3:15
HUM 110 – Moral Issues in Modern Society A critical introduction to some of the major moral issues facing us in modern society. Problems concerning the rights of the individuals vs. the limits and obligations of government, sexual morality, and violence and war will be analyzed. CT OC DL Stephenson Campus M 5:30
HUM 190 – Social Issues in Film Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores significant social issues (e.g., the HIV/AIDS Epidemic, race, gender, mental health, the food industry) as represented in films.                                                           CP CT 01–Cigdem Usekes ASYNCH
02–Jonathan Carignan Campus W 5:30
HUM 247 – Indigenous Spirituality & Enviro Activism This course looks at indigenous cultures of the Americas, Central Asia, Africa and Australia. With a focus on their vital and spiritual relationship to their distinctive environments, it examines the challenges they face from the forces of colonization and globalization, their environment actions, and the views and actions opposing them. IC IL Suzanne Potter Ironbiter Hybrid ASYNCH T 2:00-3:15
JLA 212 – Police and Social Order A study of the role of policing in modern society. This course examines the history of policing, the work of police officers, and how police organizations operate. The topics of discretion, police subculture, corruption and the use of force will also be examined. The course will look at policing as a career and at various local, state and federal police agencies. 01–Matthew McNally Campus WF 10:00-11:15
02–Leonard LaBonia Campus W 5:30-8:00
JLA 332 – Contemporary Issues in JLA An examination of contemporary topics within the justice and law administration areas will be conducted.                                                                Rainer Kroll Campus R 5:30-8:00
NWC 103 – Chinese Culture A historical-cultural approach to the study of China. Topics include: the land, people, and language systems of China; the evolution of Chinese world views; thought and religions; economic and political institutions; art and literature; family structure and social life. Every semester. IC Wynn Gadkar-Wilcox Campus MR 2:00-3:15
NWC 113 – Southern African Cultures Multidisciplinary approach to the study of the Republic of South Africa and its neighbors. Includes ethnography, history, economic development, the growth of Apartheid, the spreading of the South African problem to its contiguous countries and current political and foreign policy implications. Fall Semester. Rob Whittemore Campus TF 12:30-1:45
NWC 115 – Latin American & Caribbean Civilization This course examines the development of Latin America and the Caribbean as overlapping, though distinct regions, from before the Spanish Conquest of America to the present day. Many of the units consider a specific historical episode or era, while also posing a broader question concerning how these regions are understood in the United States. Major themes include the Conquest, Afro-Brazilian culture, popular politics in the 20th Century, revolutions and revolutionary iconography, art and literature. Classroom discussion centers on the political, social and cultural elements that characterize Latin America and the Caribbean. IC Joshua Rosenthal ASYNCH
PHI 205 – Engaged Philosophy: Peace & Justice Studies The aim of this course is to introduce students to an understanding of what peace and justice is and entails. While we come at this from a theoretical angle drawing from historical, philosophical, anthropological, political and other sources we will also consider some of the practical applications. HW, IC Anna Malavisi Campus MR 12:30-1:45
PHI 223 – Ethical Issues in Health Care Explores current ethical issues and value conflicts in health care from the standpoint of the health care professional, the patient and public policy. CT OC 01–Daniel Richmond Campus MR 11:00-12:15
02–Giorgi Lebanidze Campus TF 2:00-3:15
PS 198 – Social Justice Activism FY This course discusses major topics relating to social justice activism, including: inequalities in American society, current social justice issues, a history of political activism, and a discussion of the various ways in which individuals can advocate for change. As this course is a first year course, we will also discuss university resources, strategies for achieving academic success, and ways to navigate academic systems on campus. FY 01–Jessica Schofield Campus TF 9:30-10:45
02–Jessica Schofield Campus TF 11:00-12:15
PS 340 – Gender, Justice, and the State A course that explores the multiple ways in which gender and family life interact with American governing institutions. Students will learn how the state has evolved alongside gender roles and stereotypes as well as how gender intersects with other aspects of social life including race, class, and sexuality. IL Howell Williams Campus MW 2:00-3:15
PSY 205 – Social Psychology Social Psychology is the study of how peoples’ thoughts, feelings and behaviors are influenced by others. Specific topics include: social cognition (how do we think about the social world?), the Self (how do we understand and evaluate ourselves?), Impression formation (how do we view, categorize, and identify other people?), Stereotypes (what conscious and nonconscious beliefs do we have about various groups?), Interpersonal attraction and close relationships (what is considered to be attractive?), Social influence (how do people change others’ behaviors?), and Aggression and Helping (why do we hurt or help other people?).These and other topics will be examined through classic as well as contemporary research.Prerequisite: PSY 100. CT Multiple Multiple Multiple (See OpenClose)
PSY 309 – Social Psychology & The Law An applied course in social psychology in which various stages of the legal process will be examined from a social psychological perspective. Research and theories from areas such as person-perception, attribution, impression management, decision making and social influence will be applied to such issues as arrest, interrogation, eyewitness testimony, trial by jury and correction. Alternate years. Prerequisite: PSY 100 and PSY 205. Daniel Barrett Campus TR 12:30-1:45
PSY 313 – Cross-Cultural Psychology This course evaluates the cross-cultural applicability of psychological theory and research. It will examine the influence of culture, broadly construed, on psychological processes such as perception and cognition, development, social interactions and relationships, gender roles, self-understanding, persuasion, and psychopathology. This course will also investigate the methodological constraints and opportunities presented by cross-cultural differences. Fall semester. Prerequisite: PSY 205. IC Daniel Barrett Campus TR 2:00-3:15
SOC 100 – Intro to Sociology A survey of contemporary American society. Basic sociological theory dealt with through study of present-day American social life and institutions.                                                                                                                     CT IC Multiple Multiple Multiple (See OpenClose)
SOC 100W – Intro to Soc (Writ Intensive) A survey of contemporary American society. Basic sociological theory dealt with through study of present-day American social life and institutions.                                                                                                                     CT IC W2 Multiple Multiple Multiple (See OpenClose)
SOC 101 – Social Problems A detailed analysis of selected aspects of contemporary American society, with particular emphasis on social institutions and problems associated with them. Listed as social and behavioral sciences general education elective. Every semester. Prerequisite: SOC 100.                          Robert Brown Campus MR 9:30-10:45
SOC 211 – Latinas/os/x in United States A comparative look at Latinos/as/x in the United States, the course uses a socio-historical lens to examine political, economic and cultural links between Latin America, including the Caribbean, and the US, and then explores the growth and developments among and between the broad array of Latinos/as/x within the U.S. social structure, including family, education, health, employment and identity are explored.  Racism, and the sense of belonging and acceptance/non-acceptance, as well as empowerment and resistance movements are closely examined.  The course engages rich discussions over recognition, racial and ethnic identities, language, gendered identities, Latinos/as/x as a voting block, struggles among youth, and struggles over immigration and the border. IC CT Carina Bandhauer Online Synch R 5:30-8:00
SOC 298 – Race & Poverty in Urban America Race and poverty in urban America are too often interconnected. The COVID-19 pandemic set in on the heels of the Great Recession, resulting in economic collapse, particularly in urban areas. This has led to new levels of urgency for millions of people across the nation. These contemporary issues of race and poverty in urban America will be examined by looking at: (1) the early growth and development of cities; (2) redlining and segregation; (3) the Civil Rights Movement and the exodus from cities; (4) the resurgence of cities in the 21st century; (5) future of work, the gig economy and the proliferation of low-wage jobs; (6) affordable housing; (7) income inequality; (8) transportation; (9) the impact of COVID-19 on race and poverty; and (10) the importance of social policy. Robert Brown Campus MR 11:00-12:15
SOC 310 – Political Sociology This course introduces students to the connections between society and government through a sustained analysis of power. Power is found in the halls of Congress, but it also operates in families, neighborhoods, welfare policies, and social movements. We will study how social factors such as race, gender, and class have shaped the American state in the past and how we might achieve a more democratic future. Howell Williams Campus MW 3:30-4:45
SOC 398 -Food and Environment Food and the Environment course will help students explore how certain mainstream food practices and discourses marginalize racialized social groups, e.g., high obesity rates and the preponderance of food deserts in minority neighborhoods. It will also critically analyze alternative food movements insistence on a ‘politics of consumption’ which may promote apolitical strategies, reproduce neoliberalism, and reinforce the existing race-class divides. It will introduce students to the concept of ‘food justice’ as a better analytical framework that attends to the question of power and equity in the food system. IC W2 Manoj Misra Campus TF 12:30-1:45
SPA 110W – Latin American Film (In English) This course explores a history of Latin American cinema with an emphasis on cultural analysis. Weekly discussions include cross-cultural and cross-linguistic content. Weekly essays develop critical analysis of cultural topics. This course is taught in English. IC IL Alba Hawkins ASYNCH
SPA 111W – Spanish Film (In English) This course explores a history of Spanish cinema with an emphasis on cultural analysis. Weekly discussions include cross-cultural and cross-linguistic content. Weekly essays develop critical analysis of cultural topics. This course is taught in English. IC IL Alba Hawkins ASYNCH
SPA 222 – Cultures of Spanish America In this course we will explore the heterogeneity of Hispanic cultures in the Americas from Pre-Columbian civilizations to the twenty-first century. There will be particular focus on cultural production, specifically literature, film, art and music as contributions to the development and expression of cultures in various historical , political, and economic contexts. Prerequisite: one 200-level course in Spanish. IC Alba Hawkins Online Synch W 9:30
SW 210 – Social Welfare as an Institution This course, which is the first in a two-part social policy sequence, provides a historical and analytical assessment of social welfare as an institution, using a framework of social theories and definitions of social welfare conditions, policy goals, program design, and service delivery. It examines the evolution of social welfare in the United States and globally. It also examines contexts for practice in ways to advance human rights and social and economic justice. The functions of social work as a profession are explored in areas such as income security, family and children’s services, and health care services. Prerequisite: C+ in SOC 100. CT 01–TBA Campus MR 9:30-10:45
02–Deneen Harris Hybrid ASYNCH R 6:30-7:45
SW 220 – Cultural Diversity This course provides students with a theoretical understanding of culture, ethnicity, oppression, gender and race that informs clinical assessment and intervention. Focus is on the psychosocial dimensions of disempowerment and social work practice building on client strengths. Students will explore the differences in types of prejudice and their etiologies as well as the similarities in the consequences for those experiencing prejudice and discrimination. Emphasizing the Connecticut region, this course will analyze the significant racial, ethnic and other differences affecting professional social work practice. Comparison to other countries’ diversity issues will be made. Theoretical approaches, case studies and experiential exercises will be used to deepen the understanding of self and others. Prerequisite: C+ in SOC 100, or permission of the Department Chair. Priority given to SW and HPX majors. IC Multiple Multiple Multiple (See OpenClose)
WS 340 – Gender, Justice, and the State A course that explores the multiple ways in which gender and family life interact with American governing institutions. Students will learn how the state has evolved alongside gender roles and stereotypes as well as how gender intersects with other aspects of social life including race, class, and sexuality. IL Howell Williams Campus MW 2:00-3:15
WRT 273W – Writing Identity This workshop examines expression or exploration of identity and equity. Through a variety of writing assignments, students will participate in the ongoing discussion about identity and justice issues revolving around race, class, and gender. The course will culminate in a final semester project in a creative genre. As part of this course, students will imitate, appropriate, parody, and/or adapt the texts under examination, as well as create a semester project in a creative genre. Typical model writers and artists might include Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Maxine Hong Kingston, Toni Morrison, Yusef Komunyakaa, Sherman Alexie, and Salman Rushdie. W2 Lionel Bascom Online Synch TF 3:30-4:45