WCSU Racial Justice Coalition

* Spring 2022 Racial Justice Courses

 

Department / Course #/ Title Course Description Competencies Instructor Format Days/Times
AAS 100 – The Black Experience in America This is an interdisciplinary course that examines major historical and contemporary conditions that have contributed to shaping the experiences of black people in America. The course utilizes a variety of original source material in history, literature, art, music, film, sociology and politics in order to understand the thinking of and reaction to African-Americans over nearly 400 years. Danielle King Campus R 5:30-8:00
AAS 109 – Equatorial African Cultures A multidisciplinary approach examining the geographical, historical and socio-political aspects of contemporary equatorial Africa (including East and West Africa). Topics discussed include early state formation, colonial policies, “traditional” vs. “modern” societies, and political and economic development problems. Spring semester. Rob Whittemore Campus TF 12:30-1:45
ANT 398 – Women, Work, and Power This course focuses on working conditions for women around the globe to consider the intersections between gender, labor, and power. From corporate boardrooms to factory floors to street markets, gender delineates the kind of work we get to do, how much we are paid, and how much control we have over our labor conditions. Students will consider how gendered divisions of labor are connected to the growth of modern global capitalism, and how the requirements of capitalist expansion shape women’s and men’s access to particular opportunities, resources, and forms of power, both within and outside the home. Readings include anthropological theorizations of gender and labor, ethnographic research in subsistence economies (including hunting and gathering, pastoralist, and horticultural), and studies of entrepreneurial projects, labor migration, wage labor, and informal labor such as home-based, domestic, and street work in advanced industrial and post-industrial contexts. Through comparative readings, films, and online resources, students will consider how gender stereotypes are embedded in labor infrastructures and will examine the ways that law, religion, kinship relations, educational and reproductive rights and access, international development, and other factors structure differential conditions of production and exchange for men and women. Students will have the opportunity to do ethnographic research examining gendered experiences of contemporary labor. Christine
Hegel-Cantarella   
Campus M 3:30-6:00
ECO 198 – Economics of Social Injustice The seminal text on capitalism in the 21st century by Piketty (2014) shows a significant relationship between capitalism and inequalities. Specifically, wealth inequalities are an outcome of capitalism going rampant, which is what happened in many developed countries, such as the United States. This is the focus of this course, which will examine the intersections between racism, class, gender, environmental problems, and economic inequalities in the U.S. This course is designed to be a primer in understanding capitalism, the resulting economic injustices, and their implications. Moreover, students will evaluate proposals that aim for better wealth/income redistributions and a more egalitarian economic system. Rotua Lumbantobing Campus MR 12:30-1:45
HIS 115 – Latin American & Caribbean Civilization This course examines the development of Latin America and the Caribbean as overlapping, though distinct regions, from before the Spanish Conquest of America to the present day. Many of the units consider a specific historical episode or era, while also posing a broader question concerning how these regions are understood in the United States. Major themes include the Conquest, Afro-Brazilian culture, popular politics in the 20th century, revolutions and revolutionary iconography, art and literature. Classroom discussion centers on the political, social and cultural elements that characterize Latin America and the Caribbean. IC Joshua Rosenthal Online Asynch TBA
HIS 470 – Slavery and Abolition This course examines the history of Atlantic Slavery and its Abolition between the 15th and 19th century. From the development of the trade as a fundamental element in the creation of the Modern World this class examines the institution of slavery as an economic, cultural, political, and social reality. Topics covered include the rise of plantation economies across the Americas; the ways that slavery shaped life and society throughout the Americas away from plantations; the changes in the institution of slavery over the course of several centuries; how gender roles shaped this history for both the enslaved and free; how non-slave societies were linked to plantation economies; how resistance and flight shaped society; and the nature of abolition across the hemisphere. Joshua Rosenthal Campus T 5:30-8:00
HON 298 – Economics of Social Injustice The seminal text on capitalism in the 21st century by Piketty (2014) shows a significant relationship between capitalism and inequalities. Specifically, wealth inequalities are an outcome of capitalism going rampant, which is what happened in many developed countries, such as the United States. This is the focus of this course, which will examine the intersections between racism, class, gender, environmental problems, and economic inequalities in the U.S. This course is designed to be a primer in understanding capitalism, the resulting economic injustices, and their implications. Moreover, students will evaluate proposals that aim for better wealth/income redistributions and a more egalitarian economic system. Rotua Lumbatobing Campus MR 12:30-1:45
HON 398 – Transnational Families International migration is one of the defining characteristics of our contemporary world. It is a reality for millions of people who face treacherous socio-economic and often violent changes in their countries of origin, some even being stateless. This course focuses on the impact of international migration of families, particularly, though not exclusively, families for whom one or more members is an undocumented migrant. What is often neglected in the media and even by scholars is that international migration almost always involves families, and, except for the most fortunate migrants, it often involves long protracted periods of separation, a transformation of the communication and social relations within families, heavy impacts on children and their development, and can often mean the death of a family member. The phenomena of transnational families reflect global socio-structural change, that has already transformed whole nations, cultures and communities. It is a common attribute of the last century and, particularly with ongoing economic hardship, increasingly hastened by climate change, transnational families will continue to be characteristic of our future ahead. This course fulfills Textual, Math and Science, and the Historical/Social and Cultural Mode of Inquiry. CT IC Carina Bandhauer Online Synch M 5:30-8:00
HUM 110 – Moral Issues in Modern Society A critical introduction to some of the major moral issues facing us in modern society. Problems concerning the rights of the individuals vs. the limits and obligations of government, sexual morality, and violence and war will be analyzed. CT OC DL Stephenson Campus R 5:30
HUM 190 – Social Issues in Film Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores significant social issues (e.g., the HIV/AIDS Epidemic, race, gender, mental health, the food industry) as represented in films.                                                           CP CT Jonathan Carignan Campus W 5:30
JLA 212 – Police and Social Order A study of the role of policing in modern society. This course examines the history of policing, the work of police officers, and how police organizations operate. The topics of discretion, police subculture, corruption and the use of force will also be examined. The course will look at policing as a career and at various local, state and federal police agencies. Ricardo Lopez Campus MW 10:00-11:15
JLA 408 – Human Rights: Liberty and Justice This course will explore current topics in the areas of human rights and civil rights. It is intended to expose advanced students to current conflicting views, and will require critical thinking, writing and argument. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: Junior standing; a writing intensive (W) course; GPA 2.3 or higher.                                                               Susan Monks Campus T 5:30-8:00
NWC 107 – Middle Eastern Culture A comprehensive historical-cultural approach to the study of Middle East cultures, illustrating the use of various social science concepts in gaining an understanding of the religion of Islam and Islamic culture; the role of the Arabic language and literature; geography and politics; the various social classes, including the role of women; the influence of foreign powers; and the origins and development of regional movements, conflicts and crises, including the Arab-Israeli conflict. Ali El Moustakim Campus T 5:30-8:00
NWC 109- Equatorial African Cultures A multidisciplinary approach examining the geographical, historical and socio-political aspects of contemporary equatorial Africa (including East and West Africa). Topics discussed include early state formation, colonial policies, “traditional” vs. “modern” societies, and political and economic development problems. Spring semester. Rob Whittemore Campus TF 12:30-1:45
NWC 115 – Latin American & Caribbean Civilization This course examines the development of Latin America and the Caribbean as overlapping, though distinct regions, from before the Spanish Conquest of America to the present day. Many of the units consider a specific historical episode or era, while also posing a broader question concerning how these regions are understood in the United States. Major themes include the Conquest, Afro-Brazilian culture, popular politics in the 20th Century, revolutions and revolutionary iconography, art and literature. Classroom discussion centers on the political, social and cultural elements that characterize Latin America and the Caribbean. IC Joshua Rosenthal Online Asynch
PHI 298 – Critical Philosophy of Race This course offers students a better understanding of the concept of race as a social condition and the implications this holds at both an individual and structural level. A philosophical analysis that will consider the ethical, epistemological and metaphysical dimensions of race will be applied to the course that will offer students the opportunity to explore and analyze their own self-identity when it comes to race, but also understand the force of structural factors in perpetuating unjust social systems. Other perspectives to be considered include feminist and decolonial ones; this will enable students to understand the connections between particular ideologies and practices. Anna Malavisi Campus TR 2:00-3:15
PS 398 – African Politics This course provides an overview of the history, political systems, foreign policies, and current issues of countries across the African continent using analytical approaches from comparative politics and international relations. The course begins with a focus on the modern history of the African continent, detailing the history of colonialism and the spread of exploitative export trade across the continent before discussing the history of independence movements. Next, the course provides an overview of the main systems of government in place across African nations, highlighting the differences between democratic and autocratic systems. The course concludes with an overview of broad foreign policy trends across African nations including the prevalence of civil war, inequality across racial and ethnic groups, human rights practices, and relations with world powers. The course also includes a number of in-depth case studies of specific African countries. Jessica Schofield Campus TR 2:00-3:15
PSY 205 – Social Psychology Social Psychology is the study of how peoples’ thoughts, feelings and behaviors are influenced by others. Specific topics include: social cognition (how do we think about the social world?), the Self (how do we understand and evaluate ourselves?), Impression formation (how do we view, categorize, and identify other people?), Stereotypes (what conscious and nonconscious beliefs do we have about various groups?), Interpersonal attraction and close relationships (what is considered to be attractive?), Social influence (how do people change others’ behaviors?), and Aggression and Helping (why do we hurt or help other people?).These and other topics will be examined through classic as well as contemporary research.Prerequisite: PSY 100. CT Multiple Multiple Multiple (See OpenClose)
SOC 100 – Intro to Sociology A survey of contemporary American society. Basic sociological theory dealt with through study of present-day American social life and institutions.                                                                                                                     CT IC Multiple Multiple Multiple (See OpenClose)
SOC 100W – Intro to Soc (Writ Intensive) A survey of contemporary American society. Basic sociological theory dealt with through study of present-day American social life and institutions.                                                                                                                     CT IC Multiple Multiple Multiple (See OpenClose)
SOC 101 – Social Problems A detailed analysis of selected aspects of contemporary American society, with particular emphasis on social institutions and problems associated with them. Listed as social and behavioral sciences general education elective. Every semester. Prerequisite: SOC 100.                          CT IC W2 Joan Vecchia Campus MR 9:30-10:45
SOC 200 – Concepts of Race and Racism A socio-historical and contemporary look at race and racism, focusing mainly on the United States. This course explores how global social transformations, stemming from Western European conquest and colonization, led to the formation of “race relations.” The course examines the resulting political economy and culture of racism. The invention of and meanings attached to various racialized identities, both white and non-white, are considered as they transform over time. The course also investigates white and non-white resistance movements and, more generally, follows the evolution of perspectives and theories of race and racism. Every semester. Prerequisite: ANT 100 or SOC 100 or SOC 101. Carina Bandhauer Campus MR 11:00-12:15
SOC 398 – Women, Work, and Power This course focuses on working conditions for women around the globe to consider the intersections between gender, labor, and power. From corporate boardrooms to factory floors to street markets, gender delineates the kind of work we get to do, how much we are paid, and how much control we have over our labor conditions. Students will consider how gendered divisions of labor are connected to the growth of modern global capitalism, and how the requirements of capitalist expansion shape women’s and men’s access to particular opportunities, resources, and forms of power, both within and outside the home. Readings include anthropological theorizations of gender and labor, ethnographic research in subsistence economies (including hunting and gathering, pastoralist, and horticultural), and studies of entrepreneurial projects, labor migration, wage labor, and informal labor such as home-based, domestic, and street work in advanced industrial and post-industrial contexts. Through comparative readings, films, and online resources, students will consider how gender stereotypes are embedded in labor infrastructures and will examine the ways that law, religion, kinship relations, educational and reproductive rights and access, international development, and other factors structure differential conditions of production and exchange for men and women. Students will have the opportunity to do ethnographic research examining gendered experiences of contemporary labor.  Christine Hegel-Cantarella Campus M 3:30-6:00
SOC 498 – Transnational Families International migration is one of the defining characteristics of our contemporary world. It is a reality for millions of people who face treacherous socio-economic and often violent changes in their countries of origin, some even being stateless. This course focuses on the impact of international migration of families, particularly, though not exclusively, families for whom one or more members is an undocumented migrant. What is often neglected in the media and even by scholars is that international migration almost always involves families, and, except for the most fortunate migrants, it often involves long protracted periods of separation, a transformation of the communication and social relations within families, heavy impacts on children and their development, and can often mean the death of a family member. The phenomena of transnational families reflect global socio-structural change, that has already transformed whole nations, cultures and communities. It is a common attribute of the last century and, particularly with ongoing economic hardship, increasingly hastened by climate change, transnational families will continue to be characteristic of our future ahead. This course fulfills Textual, Math and Science, and the Historical/Social and Cultural Mode of Inquiry CT IC Carina Bandhauer Online Synch M 5:30-8:00
SPA 110W – Latin American Film (In English) This course explores a history of Latin American cinema with an emphasis on cultural analysis. Weekly discussions include cross-cultural and cross-linguistic content. Weekly essays develop critical analysis of cultural topics. This course is taught in English. IC IL Alba Hawkins Online Asynch TBA
SPA 398 – Translating Latinx (In Spanish) This course studies Latinx voices in relation to translation in the complex socio-political and economic landscape of diverse Latinx communities in the United States. Course readings will include English-language authors and bilingual English-Spanish authors, as well as translations from Spanish to English from diverse national and regional cultural backgrounds: Chicanx, Puerto Rican, Dominican-American, Cuban-American, as well as U.S. authors from Central and South America. Cultural analysis will reflect on the role of translation and publication in defining Latinx identities in the United States. Alba Hawkins Online Synch/Asynch TBA
SW 210 – Social Welfare as an Institution This course, which is the first in a two-part social policy sequence, provides a historical and analytical assessment of social welfare as an institution, using a framework of social theories and definitions of social welfare conditions, policy goals, program design, and service delivery. It examines the evolution of social welfare in the United States and globally. It also examines contexts for practice in ways to advance human rights and social and economic justice. The functions of social work as a profession are explored in areas such as income security, family and children’s services, and health care services. Prerequisite: C+ in SOC 100 CT TBA Campus MR 8:00-9:15
SW 220 – Cultural Diversity This course provides students with a theoretical understanding of culture, ethnicity, oppression, gender and race that informs clinical assessment and intervention. Focus is on the psychosocial dimensions of disempowerment and social work practice building on client strengths. Students will explore the differences in types of prejudice and their etiologies as well as the similarities in the consequences for those experiencing prejudice and discrimination. Emphasizing the Connecticut region, this course will analyze the significant racial, ethnic and other differences affecting professional social work practice. Comparison to other countries’ diversity issues will be made. Theoretical approaches, case studies and experiential exercises will be used to deepen the understanding of self and others. Prerequisite: C+ in SOC 100, or permission of the Department Chair. Priority given to SW and HPX majors. IC Multiple Multiple Multiple (See OpenClose)
SW 298 – Racial Trauma This course assists students in recognizing the pervasiveness of historical and contemporary racial trauma. Students will understand trauma responses and the impacts of racial trauma on the health/behavioral health of marginalized racial groups. Students will develop skills in trauma assessment as well as recognizing strategies used by populations to survive or thrive under oppressive conditions. Students will use a trauma-informed practice model and consider evidence-informed and traditional healing strategies that promote post traumatic growth and wellness. Emphasis is on the promotion of radical healing which includes individual care as well as changing conditions and/or policies that trigger and perpetuate trauma.  Prerequisite: SOC 100: Spring semester. Lorraine Moya Salas Online Synch W 5:00-7:30
WLC 298 – Translating Latinx This course studies Latinx voices in relation to translation in the complex socio-political and economic landscape of diverse Latinx communities in the United States. Course readings will include English-language authors and bilingual English-Spanish authors, as well as translations from Spanish to English from diverse national and regional cultural backgrounds: Chicanx, Puerto Rican, Dominican-American, Cuban-American, as well as U.S. authors from Central and South America. Cultural analysis will reflect on the role of translation and publication in defining Latinx identities in the United States. Alba Hawkins Online Synch/Asynch  W 5:30-6:45 
WS 398 – Women, Work, and Power This course focuses on working conditions for women around the globe to consider the intersections between gender, labor, and power. From corporate boardrooms to factory floors to street markets, gender delineates the kind of work we get to do, how much we are paid, and how much control we have over our labor conditions. Students will consider how gendered divisions of labor are connected to the growth of modern global capitalism, and how the requirements of capitalist expansion shape women’s and men’s access to particular opportunities, resources, and forms of power, both within and outside the home. Readings include anthropological theorizations of gender and labor, ethnographic research in subsistence economies (including hunting and gathering, pastoralist, and horticultural), and studies of entrepreneurial projects, labor migration, wage labor, and informal labor such as home-based, domestic, and street work in advanced industrial and post-industrial contexts. Through comparative readings, films, and online resources, students will consider how gender stereotypes are embedded in labor infrastructures and will examine the ways that law, religion, kinship relations, educational and reproductive rights and access, international development, and other factors structure differential conditions of production and exchange for men and women. Students will have the opportunity to do ethnographic research examining gendered experiences of contemporary labor.  Christine Hegel-Cantarella Campus M 3:00-6:00