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Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CELT)


Blackboard Support For WCSU Faculty


Excellence in Teaching Training Videos


 

  • 2021 CT OER Grant Program & Information sessions (1/11/2021)

    Call for Applications for the Connecticut Open Educational Resources Grant Program is open for all Connecticut faculty.

    During its inaugural year, the grant program was able to support 1,015 students from 13 different institutions across 60 course sections to avoid over $171,000 in textbook costs. On average, 90% of those students completed their coursework with 79% of those students receiving a letter grade of ‘C’ or better.

    Public Act 19-117 Section 147 has provided over $90,000 for this second grant round for faculty and academic departments within Connecticut’s higher education institutions to explore, adopt, supplement, and create Open Educational Resources (OER).

    The deadline for applications for this opportunity is February 15th, 2021.

    In support of this call, the council has scheduled three information sessions for those interested faculty:

    • January 21st at 12pm ET
    • January 26th at 10am ET
    • February 1st at 4pm ET

    Register for information sessions here.

    About the grant opportunity
    The Connecticut Open Educational Resources Coordinating Council is pleased to announce the return of the Connecticut Open Educational Resources Grant Program to continue the support of Connecticut higher education institutions’ efforts to increase access, affordability, and achievement for students through the incorporation of open educational resources (OER). The grant program focuses on OER opportunities in “high impact” areas – courses with high enrollment and high textbook costs for which high-quality OER already exists.

    The Connecticut Open Education Resources Grant Program is available to all Connecticut higher education institutional faculty and will support projects in the following categories:

    1. Review – Evaluate an openly licensed textbook or other open content related to your course(s)/ discipline and write a review for public display. Where possible, student involvement in the review is strongly encouraged.
    2. Adoption – Adopt an existing open textbook or open course content with little to no changes made to the content.  Where possible, student involvement is strongly encouraged. This is for an individual faculty member seeking to transform their course by adopting OER materials.
    3. Supplemental – Develop missing ancillaries for currently adopted OER such as quiz question banks, lecture slides, or lab manuals. Where possible, student involvement is strongly encouraged. This is for an individual faculty member seeking to substantively supplement their adopted OER materials.
    4. Impact – For collaborative, larger-scale proposals not covered by the categories above that demonstrate a high impact on student success through the use of OER. Cross-institutional collaborative proposals, as well as student involvement, are strongly encouraged.  Examples include (but are not limited to) Course-wide Adoptions, Collaborative Supplemental Creations, and Creation/Significant Revision of stand-alone instructional materials.

    For more information, including instructions, evaluation criteria, and requirements of grantees, please visit the Connecticut Open Educational Resources Grant Program site.

  • CELT Discussion – Grading Woes (12/7/2020)

    CELT Talk – Grading Woes

    Wednesday, December 9, 2020 | 10:30 am  |  1 hr

    Phineas and Ferb – Somebody Give Me A Grade [and make it an “A”] (1:50)

    https://youtu.be/GQ149r4NHks (video)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4MjsgNDZBg (lyrics for singalong)

    How to deal with grading dilemmas? 

    Present your questions and share your insights: 

    • How to respond to redo requests?
    • What to do with borderline scores?
    • How deal with suspected cases of academic dishonesty?
    • What is the best way to respond to challenges to final grades?
    • How to handle students’ emotional reactions to posted scores and grades?

    See VPAA academic announcements for webex link. 

  • CELT Discussion: Crisis? What Crisis? 12/2/2020 (11/30/2020)

    CELT DISCUSSION – Crisis? What Crisis?  *

    Album cover - Supertramp: Crisis? What Crisis? Released 11/29/1975

    *Album cover – Supertramp: Crisis? What Crisis? Released 11/29/1975 (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Supertramp_-_Crisis.jpg)

    Wednesday, December 2, 2020 | 10:30 am 

     Join the conversation:

    • How bad WCSU’s enrollment crisis is?
    • How concerned are you about this crisis?
    • How can faculty preserve and promote WCSU?
    • What can faculty do to keep WCSU viable during this crisis?
    • What teaching methods can attract, retain, and support students?
    • What content will make WCSU relevant and attractive to prospective students?

     

    See what others say:

     A World Economic Forum analysis published on 11/3/2020 points out that COVID-19 exposes existing tensions regarding the value of university education. It stipulates that COVID-19 means that universities might shrink or implode. It states that Universities are cornerstones of society and must be preserved.

    https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/11/covid-19-higher-education-and-the-impact-on-society-what-we-know-so-far-and-what-could-happen/

     

    An October 2020 KPMG International industry analysis of the higher education sector predicts the end of a golden age for universities, that a disruption is underway in higher education, and that change and adaptation are critical for institutional survival.

    https://assets.kpmg/content/dam/kpmg/xx/pdf/2020/10/future-of-higher-education.pdf

     

    On October 22, 2020, the US-based National Student Center Clearinghouse Research Center published an updated report on the impact of COVID-19 on US higher education enrollments. To highlight unique enrollment patterns that are attributable to the pandemic the Center reported year-over-year percent change in enrollment between 2018-2019 and 2019-2020 based on the same institutions reporting in 2018 and 2019. The data shows that COVID 19 lead to a broad and clear decline in undergraduate and freshmen enrollments and to steep declines in enrollments of minority students and students in community colleges.

    https://nscresearchcenter.org/stay-informed/

     

    Wednesday, December 2, 2020 | 10:30 am  |  (UTC-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)  |  1 hr

    By Webex, see VPAA academic announcements for details.

  • CELT WORKSHOP – Teaching “To Do” List for Spring 2021 (11/17/2020)

    CELT WORKSHOP – Teaching “To Do” List for Spring 2021

    Wednesday, November 18, 2020 | 10:30 am 

     

    Why now, so early?

    • Spring semester 2021 opens on January 26, 2021.
    • Most courses will be offered as online synchronous.
    • Updating classes takes reflection, time, and effort.

    Why should I care?

    • Many students are already experiencing “online burnout”.
    • Quality courses sustain learners’ motivation and performance.
    • Good courses and programs promote retention and graduation.
    • WCSU’s future depends on collective performance and reputation.

    What to do next? To be discussed:

    • Course Synchronous tools (Bb Collaborate, MS teams, WebEx)
    • Course Design (flow, assessment, involvement, workload)
    • Course Accessibility (text, audio/video, external links)
    • Course Bb template & variants

    Wednesday, November 18, 2020 | 10:30 am  |  (UTC-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)  |  1 hr

    By Webex, see VPAA academic announcements for details.

  • 2020-2021 BOARD OF REGENTS FACULTY AWARDS (11/3/2020)

    Nominations are being accepted for campus-based and system-wide recognitions of excellence in teaching or research/creative/scholarly work by full-time, junior faculty members and part-time faculty members of the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities.

    Teaching Awards $$$ 

    The awards are given to recognize faculty who have distinguished themselves as outstanding teachers for at least five years and have a minimum of two years’ record of accomplishment of promoting instructional improvements for the programs/departments. Each CSU institution may nominate a campus-based awardee and a system-wide awardee will be chosen from this group.

    Research Awards $$$

    The awards are given to recognize faculty from the state universities who are doing exceptional research/creative work. Each CSU institution may nominate a campus-based awardee and a system-wide awardee will be chosen from this group.

    Adjunct Faculty Teaching Awards $$$

    The awards are given to recognize part-time faculty who have distinguished themselves as outstanding teachers with a record of accomplishment of increasing student learning and promoting instructional improvements for the programs/departments. Two applicants might be selected to receive system-wide awards.

    Please submit your nominations to the committee at cunninghamj@wcsu.edu by November 27, 2020

    More information can be found at http://www.ct.edu/faculty/awards.

  • Online Teaching of Psychology Conference (10/17/2020)

    November 13th, 2020

    Title: Supporting self-management and academic engagement in graduate level behavior analytic course work

    Author: Charlotte C. Mann, Department of Counseling and Applied Behavioral Studies, University of Saint Joseph

    Abstract: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized as a developmental disorder that negatively impacts social functioning (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). As a result, navigating college can present a particular challenge for individuals with ASD relative to their typically developing peers. Individuals with ASD represent an estimated 0.7-1.9% of the college population (White, Ollendick, & Brey, 2011) and evidence suggests that this number is growing. The Massachusetts Department of Higher Education surveyed college student disability services departments and 25/26 departments reported that the number of students with ASD on their campus had increased over the past 5 years (p 95; Report from the Governor’s Special Commission Relative to Autism, 2013). Approximately 17% of the 50,000 youth diagnosed with ASD who leave high school every year in the United States attend a 4-year college or university (Roux, Shattuck, Rast, Rava, & Anderson, 2015). Though more students with ASD are entering college, reviews of attrition and graduation records found that the completion rate for these students is 79.5% (Roux et al, p 46), a full 10 points lower than college-students with other disabilities. High attrition rates are concerning both for the students with ASD who are not attaining degrees and for post-secondary institutions that are losing qualified students. This presentation will highlight recent advancements in research orbiting around what faculty and administrators can do to facilitate the success of students with ASD in their classroom.

    Learning objectives:

    1. Explain how the core diagnostic features of ASD may present challenges to college students.

    2. Describe how universal design techniques can be used to improve the experiences of all students in their classroom.

    3. Identify at least 1 strategy that can be incorporated into their pedagogy to support students on the autism spectrum.

    To register and for more info, visit the Online Teaching of Psychology Conference page

  • Online Teaching of Psychology Conference (10/16/2020)

    November 13th, 2020

    Title: Supporting self-management and academic engagement in graduate level behavior analytic course work

    Author: Meghan Brahm, Ph.D., BCBA., LBA-CT. Assistant Professor, Southern Connecticut State University

    Abstract: Given the increase in online psychology programs, the need to support student’s proficiency in self-managed academic behaviors continues to grow. Self-regulated learning strategies and academic self-efficacy have been studied in relation to both traditional and online learning. Research has shown factors such as metacognition, effort regulation, critical thinking, and academic self-discipline to be related to academic success. However, there remains a gap in understanding the discrete behaviors and operations which predict online success. Additionally, there remains a difficulty in supporting students who lack these skills and related motivation through online course completion. This presentation will discuss the use of electronic self-management methods applied to observable and measurable academic behaviors. Discussion will offer a framework for the use of student lead self-management tools specific to graduate level applied behavior analysis courses.

    Learning objectives:

    1. Identify discrete behaviors predictive of academic success.

    2. Describe barriers to academic success in virtual environments.

    3. Describe how self-management strategies may impact student’s academic behavior.

    To register and for more info, visit the Online Teaching of Psychology Conference page

  • Online Teaching of Psychology Conference (10/13/2020)

    November 13th, 2020

    Title: Let’s Discuss It: Research Based Techniques for Initiating and Sustaining Engaging Class Discussions

    Author: Maya Aloni, Department of Psychology, Western Connecticut State University

    Abstract: Teaching and learning through class discussions has many benefits for developing students’ critical thinking skills and fostering a sense of community. However, it is challenging to engage all students in a course, as well as to sustain the conversation at a high-level once it has been initiated. One way in which these challenges can be overcome is by creating effective discussion prompts as well as assigning students to discussion roles. The presenter will first review research on best practices for designing effective discussion prompts and will share an exercise she developed for constructing discussion questions. She will then review research on the effectiveness of assigning students to discussion roles and will demonstrate how she has implemented these roles across various class settings (i.e. synchronous vs. asynchronous, in-person vs. online, large class vs. small groups) and course levels (e.g. introductory, sophomore and capstone).

    Learning objectives:

    Participants in this presentation should be able to:

    1. Identify the benefits and challenges of sustaining an engaging class discussion.

    2. Distinguish between effective and ineffective discussion prompts.

    3. Articulate how discussion roles can be utilized to facilitate discussion.

    4. Apply the material covered in this session to their own courses.

    To register and for more info, visit the Online Teaching of Psychology Conference page

  • Online Teaching of Psychology Conference (10/12/2020)

    November 13th, 2020

    Title: Active Student Responding to Increase Student Engagement in Online University Course

    Author: Stephanie A.C. Kuhn, Department of Education and Educational Psychology, Western Connecticut State University

    Abstract: Data suggest that just over one third of students in post-secondary education settings enrolled in at least one online course (IPEDS, Spring 2018). In an unprecedented situation in the spring 2020 all universities were forced to quickly move courses online after the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic. It is unclear how this will influence student enrollment in online courses in the future. Regardless, there is a role for online learning in post-secondary education settings. There are challenges that come with online teaching, one of the primary ones being student engagement. Research has shown that promoting active student responding in course activities increases engagement. This presentation will detail the use of specific methods and technology to incorporate active student responding in online courses. Preliminary data on the effects of an active student responding components in a graduate level program will be presented and discussed.

    To register and for more info, visit the Online Teaching of Psychology Conference page

  • Online Teaching of Psychology Conference (10/9/2020)

    November 13th, 2020

    Title: Online Behavioral Instruction: An Introduction

    Author: James W. Diller, Department of Psychological Science, Eastern Connecticut State University

    Abstract: Within the context of higher education, behavior analysts have made substantial contributions to the development of effective instructional techniques. These techniques typically involve frequent opportunities for active responding, individualized feedback, breaking material into small units, and the management of consequences to promote learning. Although many of these strategies were developed prior to the advent of online education, they can be applied in this environment. This presentation will describe behavior-analytic instructional techniques including interteaching and personalized systems of instruction, with a focus on how to carry out these techniques in an online instructional setting. Best practices, derived from the existing research literature, will be described.

    Learning objectives:

    Viewers of this presentation should be able to:

    1. Define behavioral instruction.

    2. Explain the research support for behavioral instruction techniques.

    3. Describe how to use behavioral instruction techniques to promote online learning.

     

    To register and for more info, visit the Online Teaching of Psychology Conference page