Chemistry and Biochemistry

Course Descriptions

Concepts of Chemistry (CHE100): This one-semester course is designed for the under-prepared student to enter CHE 110 or CHE 120. Using a mathematical and quantitative approach, it concentrates on basic concepts and principles. Among these are the scientific method and philosophy, measurement, nomenclature, atomic stucture, formulas and equations, periodicity, bonding, solutions, acids, bases, salts, stoichiometry and redox reactions. Emphasis will be placed on the mole concept. By attaining a grade of “C” or better in this course a student will be admitted to CHE 110 without the placement exam. Students majoring or minoring in chemistry may not apply credit for this course toward meeting their chemistry requirements.

Course offered every semester ( 3 hrs lecture – 2 hrs laboratory).

Everyday Chemistry (CHE102): Designed for non-science majors. The goal of this course is to give the nonscientist an appreciation of the contributions of chemistry. Concepts will be presented in a nonmathematical approach. Areas to be covered include biochemical drugs, genes, enzymes; ecological-pollution, water testing, food additives; synthetic-soaps, detergents, alcohol, artificial flavors; energy-car battery, alternative energy sources. Laboratory experiments will complement the lecture.

Course offered every semester (3 hrs lecture – 2hrs laboratory).
Course Attributes: MLS Gen Ed – Laboratory Science; Critical Thinking (CT); Scientific Inquiry (SI).

General Chemistry I (CHE110): This full year course comprises a thorough survey of the modern principles of chemistry. Emphasis during the first semester is on atomic and molecular structure, quantitative relationships, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. In the second semester the emphasis is on physical and chemical equilibria, kinetics and descriptive chemistry. (Meets general education requirements only if CHE 111 is also successfully completed.)

Course offered every semester (3 hrs lecture – 3 hrs laboratory).
Course Attributes: CSUS Common Course, MLS Gen Ed -Laboratory Science.

General Chemistry II (CHE111): This full year course comprises a thorough survey of the modern principles of chemistry. Emphasis during the first semester is on atomic and molecular structure, quantitative relationships, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. In the second semester the emphasis is on physical and chemical equilibria, kinetics and descriptive chemistry.

Course offered every semester (3 hrs lecture – 3 hrs laboratory).
Course Attributes: CSUS Common Course, MLS Gen Ed -Laboratory Science, Scientific Inquiry (SI).

Survey of Chemistry I (CHE120): This continuous two-semester course comprises the fundamentals of inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry and biological chemistry which are necessary for elementary courses in physiology, nutrition, pharmacology, bacteriology and other courses in the nursing and health-related fields. The laboratory experiments are designed to emphasize the main topics. (Meets general education requirements only if CHE 121 is also successfully completed.) Permission must be obtained from either the instructor or the department chairman in order to enter CHE 121 by transferring credit for the equivalent of CHE 120 from another school.

Course offered every Fall semester (3 hrs lecture – 3 hrs laboratory).
Course Attributes: MLS Gen Ed -Laboratory Science, Critical Thinking (CT).

Survey of Chemistry II (CHE121): This continous two-semester course comprises the fundamentals of inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry and biological chemistry which are necessary for elementary courses in physiology, nutrition, pharmacology, bacteriology and other courses in the nursing and health-related fields. The laboratory experiments are designed to emphasize the main topics. Permission must be obtained from either the instructor or the department chairman in order to enter CHE 121 by transferring credit for the equivalent of CHE 120 from another school.

Course offered every Spring semester (3 hrs lecture – 3 hrs laboratory).
Course Attributes: MLS Gen Ed -Laboratory Science. 

Analytical Chemistry Lecture (CHE205): This course is designed to meet the needs of the students majoring in chemistry, biology, medical technology and pre-medicine. The theoretical aspects of modern analytical chemistry will be studied. Topics included are: data evaluation with error analysis, gravimetric, titrimetric, chromatographic, electroanalytical and optical methods of analyses.

Course offered every Fall semester (3 hrs lecture).
Course Attributes: Biology Major Electives. 

Analytical Chemistry Lab (CHE206): This is a laboratory course designed to complement the lecture material in CHE 205. Acquisition of data by accurate and precise manipulative techniques is emphasized. Data reduction is accomplised by computer analysis. Areas of analysis include: gravimetry, titrimetry, potentiometry, chromatography, visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy, atomic absorption and atomic emission spectroscopy.

Course offered every Fall semester (two 3-hour laboratories per week).
Course Attributes: Biology Major Electives, Scientific Inquiry (SI).

Organic Chemistry I (CHE210): A full-year course designed to present the principles and theories of the chemistry of the principal groups of carbon compounds. These various groups will be interrelated on the basis of common reaction mechanisms. 

Course offered every Fall semester (3 hrs lecture – 4 hrs laboratory).

Organic Chemistry II (CHE211): A full-year course designed to present the principles and theories of the chemistry of the principal groups of carbon compounds. These various groups will be interrelated on the basis of common reaction mechanisms.

Course offered every Spring semester (3 hrs lecture – 4 hrs laboratory).

Chemistry Seminar (CHE250): This course is designed to provide those topics and skills necessary for a complete background in chemistry which are not found in other structured chemistry courses. Topics covered will include such areas as OSHA regulations, handling and disposal of toxic substances, use of chemical literature such as Chemical Abstracts, Scientific Information Retrieval Systems and technical writing. Student presentations will cover topics mutually agreed upon by the students and faculty. This course may be repeated as often as desired. A minimum of 1 semester hour is required and a maximum of 2 semester hours may be applied toward graduation. Grading will be on a pass/fail basis.

Course offered every Spring semester (1 hr lecture).

Physical Chemistry I (CHE300): This full-year course is designed to provide a theoretical study of the behavior of matter in the gaseous, liquid and solid states through analysis of the principles of thermodynamics, chemical kinetics and equilibria, chemistry of solutions, atomic and molecular structure.

Course offered every Fall semester (3 hrs lecture – 3 hrs laboratory).
Course Attributes: Biology Major Electives.  

Physical Chemistry II (CHE301): This full-year course is designed to provide a theoretical study of the behavior of matter in the gaseous, liquid and solid states through analysis of the principles of thermodynamics, chemical kinetics and equilibria, chemistry of solutions, atomic and molecular structure.

Course offered every Spring semester (3 hrs lecture – 3 hrs laboratory).

Inorganic Chemistry (CHE311): An introduction to modern concepts of inorganic chemistry, including electronic structures, molecular structures and periodic classification of the elements. Additional topics will be selected from the following areas: bonding theories, quantum theory, solid state theory, transition metal complexes, methods of structural determination, bioinorganic chemistry and instrumental techniques currently used in inorganic chemistry. The experiments chosen are to illustrate inorganic synthetic techniques, methods of purification and methods of characterization.

Course offered every Fall semester (3 hrs lecture – 3 hrs laboratory).

Instrumental Analysis Lecture (CHE400): The intent of this course is the effective and knowledgeable use of modern chemical instrumentation in order to solve chemical problems. Areas covered will include theory and fundamental concepts of instrumentation with application and interpretation of results. Topics include: analog and digital electronics and electroanalytic, spectroscopic and chromatographic methods.

Course offered every Spring semester (3 hrs lecture).

Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (CHE401): Laboratories complement the lecture material in CHE 400. Experiments include selections of the following techniques and instruments: spectroscopic (UV/VIS, FTIR, photoluminescense, AA, ICPOES, FTNMR), chromatographic (GC, HPLC), mass spectrometric (MALDI-TOF quadrupole MS) and hyphenated instrumental methods (GC-MS).

Course offered every Spring semester (two 3-hour laboratories per week).

Biochemistry Lecture I (CHE421): This full-year course comprises a study of the major classes of biologically important compounds, their metabolic interconversions and enzymology. Emphasis is on the application of fundamental chemical principles to biological systems.  

Course offered every Fall semester (3 hrs lecture). 

Biochemistry Lecture II (CHE422): This full-year course comprises a study of the major classes of biologically important compounds, their metabolic interconversions and enzymology. Emphasis is on the application of fundamental chemical principles to biological systems.

Course offered every Spring semester (3 hrs lecture). 

Biochemistry Lab (CHE431): A laboratory course which provides an introduction to many of the methods used in modern biochemical research and analysis and the principles on which they are based. Methods covered include UV/Vis spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, gel chromatography, HPLC, enzyme kinetics and recombinant DNA techniques. Students work with considerable independence.

Course offered every Spring semester (6 hrs laboratory). 

Senior Research (CHE430): Open to Senior chemistry majors only, this course will consist of an individual research project designed to give experience in planning and conducting research. The use of modern instruments and techniques will be emphasized. This course is required for an ACS-approved degree. 

Course offered every semester (4 hrs lecture).